Can lip buzzing and mouthpiece buzzing become harmful if used to much?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by mctrumpet, Apr 10, 2008.

  1. craigph

    craigph Piano User

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    Mar 12, 2010
    Japan

    Old thread, but I especially liked this comment from the eminently quotable R.


    I don't have a dog in this race - I have never done lip or mouthpiece buzzing nor ever thought about whether I buzz or not - I just blow and some sounds come out. But the other day I was driving home and started to lip-buzz some stuff in the car. (Something I don't do normally.) When I got home and took out my trumpet and found I couldn't play very well. I figure I over-did it.
     
  2. tpsiebs

    tpsiebs Piano User

    384
    46
    Feb 6, 2010
    Randolph, New Jersey
    Balance and moderation are key elements of any routine. ANYTHING done to excess is dangerous. Buzzing with and without the mouthpiece can and should be done as they are analogous to playing but are not substitutes for playing. As I've stated in similar threads, two of my teachers (who are very well respected in the area of trumpet pedagogy) are believers in buzzing. One of them is interested only with the mechanics of the lips on the mouthpiece and the other in the therapeutic benefits of "free buzzing" and mouthpiece buzzing. Both are advocates of pitch bending. Neither one is right or wrong. However, this physical approach works for me. In 18 months, I've added a fifth to my already respectable "G over high C" range and I am just getting stronger and stronger, buzzing my way to fundamentally correct tone production technique.
     
  3. tpsiebs

    tpsiebs Piano User

    384
    46
    Feb 6, 2010
    Randolph, New Jersey
    Balance and moderation are key elements of any routine. ANYTHING done to excess is dangerous. Buzzing with and without the mouthpiece can and should be done as they are analogous to playing but are not substitutes for playing. As I've stated in similar threads, two of my teachers (who are very well respected in the area of trumpet pedagogy) are believers in buzzing. One of them is interested only with the mechanics of the lips on the mouthpiece and the other in the therapeutic benefits of "free buzzing" and mouthpiece buzzing. Both are advocates of pitch bending. Neither one is right or wrong. However, this physical approach works for me. In 18 months, I've added a fifth to my already respectable "G over high C" range and I am just getting stronger and stronger, buzzing my way to fundamentally correct tone production technique.
     

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