Can too much practice damage your chops?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by eviln3d, Feb 19, 2016.

  1. seilogramp

    seilogramp Piano User

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    Sometimes I'll record my entire practice session using Audacity. Then using the "Truncate Silence" effect, I'll remove anything -30 dB lasting longer than 5 seconds. Often this will take a 3-hour session (from case open to case closed) down to 45 minutes of actual playing time.

    So when you hear about people practicing or rehearsing for 6 hours a day, I have to wonder what that actually means.
     
  2. NFS_87

    NFS_87 Pianissimo User

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    This is a very interesting idea! It really drives home the point that practicing for an extended period doesn't mean playing non stop, or even the majority of the time.
     
  3. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I've often heard of symphony orchestra's rehearsing for 6 hours, but finally realized that doesn't mean that every instrument is playing continuously for 6 hours. Too, when the conductors call was "Let's take it again at E" did not always mean I or any other in the brass section had not prior played as well as possible. The baton was in my hand when I realized such was primarily for balancing the sections against another in harmony or just that the tempo had become wrong, as I now give as just a few examples. Still, playing over and over again the same notes seemingly endlessly is not well liked by any player.
     
  4. fels

    fels Piano User

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    i was one who did not like marching band in HS. Was first chair but did not like marching band. Went to college as a non-music major and auditioned for the non-major band. Was told that i was good enough to play first part,now go get your marching band uniform and change your schedule. No option. was told "you need us more than we need you." I declined marching band and was denied the non major band. I played on my own through college and beyond and still play and improve 50 years later. The experience is not for everyone. My son enjoyed college marching band immensely.
     
  5. seilogramp

    seilogramp Piano User

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    I went to Bradley University in the late 70s. No football program, therefore no marching band. But there was a basketball band. I used to practice with a whisper mute during the band's down time. I think I stopped when Indiana State and Larry Bird was playing us.
     
  6. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    Fels,

    I hear you. Marching Band isn't for everyone. In high school we had concert band, jazz band, pit band, marching band, brass ensemble, symphony band, and one or two others groups that I don't remember the name. Was forced into marching because I was first. Hated it. Purposefully hunted out a university without a football team when I went to college. My real love was jazz band. Surprisingly my son is just the opposite. Lead chair, but he loves marching- is bored with jazz band. By the way, working as a band director for 3 year I obviously had to have a marching band (1s at competition for all 3 years including at some multistage competitions). Enjoyed the directing far more than being a participant.

    So, Guess our point is that if the OPs daughter enjoys the marching band, she should definitely continue. In most high schools it is pretty much required of the better players.
     
  7. eviln3d

    eviln3d Pianissimo User

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    Her biggest problem is she doesn't like marching band and prefers jazz band... the head of the band program doesn't give a flip about jazz band but requires anyone in jazz band to do marching band. Though in my eyes the biggest issue isn't the time in the summer but the time during school when 2 days a week I don't see any time for homework in any of the other classes.
     
  8. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    I understand. However, if she is only rehearsing 2 days a week you are lucky. We worked 4 days a week (Mon.-Thurs.) after school plus Fri was game night which went from end of school to often late in the night with away games. And, when we decided to go to a multistage competition the practice resumed in the spring.
     
  9. JRgroove

    JRgroove Mezzo Piano User

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    Time commitment is no different than basketball, football, swimming, debate, theater, robotics team or many of the other activities available to our children. Many of the marching band members are doing more than one sport plus other activities such as student council, chess club .. ect, along with being on the honor roll. :shock:
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2016
  10. fels

    fels Piano User

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    apologies in advance since i am going off thread a bit.

    I think HS Bands and Band directors are archetypes. If you are a good player, the director expects you to play in everything at the expense of everything. That was the way it was in the sixties - and i suspect it is that way now. No question the the extreme exposure and discipline creates good players. But to what end? I love(ed) music and will always play. I did not want to be a music major or a professional.

    My daughter was a good basketball and softball player in HS (within past fifteen years). Both sport coaches wanted (nearly demanded) 100% commitment to their respective sport plus travel teams plus clinics. My daughter was good but she did not share that degree of passion (OCD).

    My cousin is from a very musically gifted parentage. While in HS he was visiting and played the piano. Very gifted- plus voice. My counsel to him was to not major in music but to follow whatever other path he was interested in. My counsel was that music would be with him forever as an amateur ( in the literal meaning). But that he had to choose a career. His parents frowned deeply - but that is what he did. Better for it.

    So back to the archetypes - (Nietzsche?) Band directors were doing this type of OCD directing before the there was Title IX and Club sports.

    Do they (Band Directors) all channel the collective fathers of Mozart and Beethoven?

    Apologies -
     

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