'Can you even out' a raw brass finish ?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by yoelarry, Feb 26, 2011.

  1. yoelarry

    yoelarry New Friend

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    I had the lacquer finish from a vintage trumpet stripped about 8 months ago because I wanted a raw brass finish.
    The darker patina is gradually setting in but there are all kinds of water spots and other 'blotchy' areas that make the horn look like it has leprosy. I don't intend on having it polished or lacquered but am just wondering if the patina will eventually 'even out' into one shade and the 'discoloration spots' disappear?
    Is there anything I can do to speed up the process?
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2011
  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    The acids in your hands should be enough to speed the patina process. Just grab the shiny parts on a regular basis to even the effect out.
     
  3. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    There is no musical benefit from raw brass.
     
  4. Jackson Arch

    Jackson Arch Piano User

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    It is fairly evident that yoelarry was not seeking opinions on the musical benefits of raw brass; instead, he asked how to even out the patina.

    Maybe someone on the forum has some good tips which will aid in that area. Short of that, it is likely that the horn will look ugly for a while, until the patina darkens. It will never fully even out, but as it darkens it will improve. As Vulgano Brother has stated, if the horn is being played/handled, the process will be impacted. If you are unhappy with the way it is currently progressing, you might want to give it a good, solid polishing with something like brasso and a warm bath, and then let it go again. Where you live (climate) will play a part as well.
     
  5. hup_d_dup

    hup_d_dup Piano User

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    It's fairly evident that Brekelefuw was commenting on the OP's remark:

    Whether or not you believe there is a musical benefit to raw brass, his comment was relevant and appropriate.
     
  6. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    Whatever the merits of the above conversation, I have "rediscovered" the Blitz cloth for slide and valve care. It did a great job of evening out the patina and removing water marks etc on a raw brass Flugelhorn that was in my shop recently.
     
  7. Jackson Arch

    Jackson Arch Piano User

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    Well, actually there is a distinct difference between providing answers/suggestions to a valid question submitted within a post and rendering opinions in the form of presumed "facts" or criticism. Again, the post asked about the formation of patina on a horn (there are two question marks within the post and neither involves musical benefit); valid questions that many on this forum could comment upon from experience and perhaps assist yoelarry with his desired result.

    If I post that my Bach Strad isn't playing the way I would like when it is cold and I ask if anyone has experienced the same, responses such as "well, Bach's are lousy horns" or "go back inside where it is warm" are irrelevant.
     
  8. Jackson Arch

    Jackson Arch Piano User

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    And, with that, I yield my remaining time to the honorable gentleman from the great state of New York who brings to the table a fine suggestion on the subject.
     
  9. trumpetsplus

    trumpetsplus Fortissimo User

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    This is fun!:thumbsup:
     
    Vulgano Brother likes this.
  10. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    Why not clear up myths while we're at it?
     

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