Can your sound get too dark? Does it?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by rhosch, Feb 25, 2009.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    If we learn proper breathing habits, practice intelligently and pay attention to decent body use, our sound gravitates to a resonant whole without this dark and bright crap. It is possible to influence sound through hardware, but the resonant "ring" of good sound is NOT A FUNCTION OF HORN OR MOUTHPIECE! If our sound does not have projection, then our problem is not bright or dark. It is a dull or mushy sound that is not fixed by listening to the masters, rather by learning to play properly.

    If we like our sound, but it has no projection, then we have a bigger job ahead of us. We need to fix body, breathing and ears.
     
  2. strad116055

    strad116055 Pianissimo User

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    i must defer to rowuk here, because anything i wrote preceeding his comment must assume what he says here as inherent. any sound that a player produces must start from the place of resonance in order to be viable, and that relies on the sound being produced properly. it is only then that further descriptive words have any meaning. to go further, the opposite is also true. a sound that is produced improperly and therefore has no resonance can only be accurately described as a poor sound. learning to play properly is largely a physical process, which must take place before decisions involving sound concept and equipment can be realistically made.
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    AND Zombies.... people going back to 2009 archives do not dabble... ADMIT IT.... You are hooked on the trumpet.... Arn't cha. Don't worry you are in the right place, here at TrumpetMasters...
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    As typical discussions in darkness go... The concept is very Subjective... We all have different definitions of darkness (mine is a pure tone sound). So don't let the banter get to you, we are ALL right as darkness is what it means to you, he individual.
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    With that said: Clearly the ONLY true DARK trumpet is the Harrelson Midnight... It is lacquered in black.
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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  7. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    And yet there is such a thing as a bright or a dark sound with the trumpet, even if we're playing the resonant whole. That has always been my goal, but the equipment we use plays a role in our overall sound. With some equipment that resonant whole is brighter, and with other equipment it is darker - it has to be factored in or else we work harder than necessary to blend in the context of the situation. There is a certain amount of coloring we can do using our ears and chops, but that has limits.
     
  8. strad116055

    strad116055 Pianissimo User

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    i have to admit i did a double take when i looked at the original post date. but somebody else resurrected the thread before i did. there is also another thread about darkness currently going on right now. but yeah, i'm a little hooked on trumpetmaster. i probably spend too much time here that i should spend practicing.

    i think that there is general acknowledgement that there is such a thing as dark sounding equipment and dark sounding players, and it has something to do with the balance of overtones. i can't speak for rowuk, but i think the objections he raises have to do with the misuse of the word, not the word itself. what i'm getting from him is "let's not confuse the good player who chooses a certain sound from a whole pallette of sounds with a player who can only produce an un-focused sound because he doesn't play the instrument properly." its like confusing a stick figure painting by a 6 year old with a picasso. elevating someone's inability to really play the instrument to the level of an artistic choice is not really valid.
    for any student of the trumpet, regardless of age, this would be a very short sighted course of action.
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    You're point is well made above (I even gave it a like), but as a pediatrician I may correct you that a stick figure would be more at the level of a 3 year old. Just trying to keep it real.
     

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