Cardio's role in playing?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Mark_Kindy, Jan 29, 2012.

  1. thatsmagic83

    thatsmagic83 New Friend

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    Exercise will do you no good! ;-)
     
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Here is the summary of the article I referred to in the post above:

    British Medical Journal. 1999 Dec 18-25;319(7225):1612-3.

    The observed association between woodwind players, especially saxophonists, and mortality has a plausible biological explanation. Raised pressure in the neck region can increase mortality either by reducing blood supply to the brain (cerebrovascular ischaemia) or venous stasis (thromboembolism). This theory is strengthened by the observation of a dose*response effect whereby the saxophonists and other woodwind instrument players, with maximum and intermediate likelihood of circular breathing respectively, are correspondingly ranked in the levels of mortality. The results need to be interpreted with caution, as circular breathing was not measured directly.


    The evidence in this article as to a lower life expectancy in sax players (drug use and chronic medical conditions were well controlled) as related to circular breathing, I am still not completely convinced. But to date, this is the only article in the medical literature that addresses mortality causes in sax players. But from my experience in working with sax players, I believe mortality is related to the women they keep!
     
  3. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Mark, all night long I now sleep with an O2 concentrator as pulls O2 out of the air and delivers it to me ... and I still wake up with "rubbery" flushed lips which I don't class as a problem or even really think about with my practice/playing as they're gone by then.

    Still, I've found if I want to play in the high range above the staff, that it is much less effort to play those notes on my Schilke P5-4 piccolo trumpet albeit it uses a cornet mouthpiece, and even so there isn't that much music that calls for / requires a trumpet to play such notes. Otherwise, it would be ostentacious to do so IMO. Admittedly, I do it as I've frequently transposed C piccolo and violin parts, and every so often a high piano part to play on my trumpets, since the latter is a larger resource of my music.
     
  4. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

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    Learn to breath abdominally,( diaphram breathing ). It will increase the volume of air taken in and if done properly will help to exhaust more CO2 from your lungs. The reason that we exhale and inhale is the percentage of CO2 in our lungs. When the CO2 level rises we are forced to exhale and grab a new breath. Try to evacuate as much air as you can from your lungs, and then, take a deep breath while forcing youirself not to allow your chest and shoulders to move. You might need to have a brass instrument coach or singing coach teach you how to breath properly.



    OLDLOU>>
     
  5. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    My working hypothesis is that playing trumpet can cause a person to hyperventilate, but if you look at the chemical basis for hyperventilation it is essentially caused by the drop in CO2 leading to a Ph imbalance(not having too much oxygen as is the popular myth). So, a way to counter this is to exercise, which leads to lactic acid replacing the Ph of the acidic CO2. It is all related. For people who are already more efficient, this may not be a problem, or if you drink a couple of sugar loaded carbonated soft drinks before playing.
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    You are correct in that what you describe is a function of ventilation (not oxygenation). But using one's breath to play through phrases (without inhaling) would result in hypoventilation, not hyperventilation, such that you are on the doorstep of respiratory acidosis (rise in CO2). However, with the buffering capacity of our bicarbonate and organic acids/electrolytes under normal conditions, while we are playing long phrases, it is highly unlikely trumpet players would be in the clinical range of respiratory acidosis (pH < 7.38; 0.02 pH units on either side of 7.40 to be diagnosed with a respiratory acid-base balance disorder).
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Will not deny that some may hypOventilate when playing, especially so among the "blasters" who push against the threshhold of their own capacity for lung conversion / synthesis of O2 to CO2. While true that extreme exercise produced the burn of lactosis in the muscle groups, I don't believe a gas chromatographic analysis of the exhalation after exercise will reveal significant trace of lactic acid being present. Acids all require the chemistry of Hydrogen, and while we do inhale some of it along with other impurites, such is mostly a covalent transition to moisture or H2O in our exhalation which we do not want a build up remaining in our lungs and the subsequent potential diagnoses of pleurisy. Too, we don't want a build up of CO2 in our lungs displacing O2, as then you'll faint viz the emergency procedure of blowing into a paper bag so often deployed by first responders, while a repirator bag is more effective. Yes, other acids are present within our lungs that are helpful.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2012
  8. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    It doesn't matter if we exhale lactic acid or not, what triggers the hyperventilation response is PH of the blood. Furthermore one need not have to be clinical for the body to respond to changes in PH. For example yawning or buffering acid by mobilizing calcium from the bones to neutralize a coke you just drank. The reason trumpet players do hyperventillate, even though they aren't breathing in more frequently, is that they are continuously breathing out. IE exhaling CO2, the more they exhale the more CO2 goes out the more CO2 goes out the more acidic there PH...
     
  9. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Don't drink Coca-Cola or other sugar laden carbonated beverage unless I've a sudden significant drop in blood sugar and have no glucose tablets or other remedy available whereas I am diabetic. Don't know about blood PH, but my blood is wacky in some way, that though I'm A Pos, I must now carry a card with seriologic findings that my blood is "Anti JK a", the "a" shown as exponential. This card was provided me post heart surgery in 2010.

    I may be off my thinking cap, but I think you you write of the PH of acids in the lungs that assist in the exchange of O2 to CO2 that with the exhalation of excessive moisture would become more concentrated and imbalanced and may be noticeable with bad breath. Possibly, that is the method my wife uses to determine if I've practiced on one of my brass horns or not when we kiss on her arrival home from work each evening. Sometimes I can taste a difference.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2012
  10. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    See either breathing excessively, or very deeply...

    Hyperventilation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Also every had a horn with red rot?
     

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