Cardio's role in playing?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Mark_Kindy, Jan 29, 2012.

  1. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,108
    9,262
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    We do not exhale lactic acid, the kidneys handle the elimination of most organic acids, of which most are non volatile (are not released as a gas). The beauty of our buffering system is having the ability for releasing the ONLY volatile organic acid (CO2). In this way we can rapidly remove acid and not have to depend on a slower filter system (renal) to accommodate such rapid changes. In diseased states (such as diabetic ketoacidosis) other volatile organic acids (acetone) are released, but this is not how our body's maintain pH.

    A common trigger for hyperventilation in trumpet players would be anxiety [not while playing, but rather prior to a performance or between rest breaks]. Normal playing does not trigger ANY metabolic pH imbalance, because the great creator designed a fabulous system as noted above
    .


    No, not quit, this is handled by secretin release once this acid hits the duodenum, this stimulates bicarb secretion from the pancreas and the bone doesn't even feel the stress of such changes. What would contribute to the POTENTIAL to leach calcium out of bone is all the phosphate that is absorbed from soft drinks/sodas.


    You must breath VERY RAPIDLY to hypERventillate. Breathing in deep without increasing the loss of gas and there for a drive for gas exchange, will not contribute significantly to a loss of CO2 from the BODY.
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2012
  2. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

    8,040
    2,035
    Aug 16, 2009
    Jackson NC
    All but one of my brass instruments are pre-owned, yet only one has the minimal beginnings of ret rot which I hope through my care I've arrested with acid neutralizing baths, a strigent regimen of swabbing, and internal non-petroleum based lubrication. A few of my horns have gone through one or more ultrasound /chemical cleanings. Yes, the culprit is acid as I believe is a break down of carbon in our CO2 exahalation, more specifically now a hydrocarbon / carbolic acid or carbonic acid??? Too many years since I studied chemistry.

    Pretty good Wikipedia article on hyperventilation, but like Wikipedia's disclaimer, it is not authoritative.

    What me worry now about it? No, when I die there won't be a need for anyone to tell me how!
     
  3. soluna1

    soluna1 New Friend

    5
    0
    Jan 15, 2012
    Chattanooga, TN
    I am a runner and a trumpet player. I've been running and playing for 25 years and have come to believe that my cardio training really helps my playing. It increases air capacity greatly. It also makes your diaphram muscles stronger. I have known many trumpet players that are out of shape that play really well. However, in my opinion, I think they would improve with cardio training. So, I'm saying that while it's not necessary in order to be a great player, it will improve anyone's playing!:-)
     
  4. Phil986

    Phil986 Forte User

    1,094
    329
    Nov 16, 2009
    Near Portland, OR.
    Thanks to Gary for clearing some of the confusion on this thread.

    This is backwards:
    When hyperventilating (a function of respiratory rate, or breaths per minue), we exhale more CO2, leading to a an increase in pH, i.e. a change toward a more alkalotic pH, not more acidic. Hyperventilation can be a physiological response to an acidotic state, in which the body responds to acidosis by using the most readily available and quickest way to correct pH.

    It can also be a psychological response triggered by anxiety, in which case it will likely lead to an alkalotic state. The reason why people who are panicky and hyperventilating are told to breath in a paper bag is that, by breathing air that is already enriched in CO2, they will not loose as much CO2, thereby limiting the alkalosis.
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,108
    9,262
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    Also nicely stated Philippe. So I think that about covers this lecture series on ventilation.

    Now I am interested on the continued read as it applies to cardio. AND yes, running will develop this ability and truly benefit cardiac function. The better the cardiac output, the better the movement of blood and ability to optimize or respiratory capacity (gas exchange).
     
  6. peanuts56

    peanuts56 Pianissimo User

    144
    47
    Jan 18, 2009
    Regular physical exercise may not not improve your playing. It does however improve the bodies ability to handle the physical demands that playing a brass instrument presents.
    Look at Doc and Maynard. Doc at 84 can outplay most trumpet players half his age. Doc is also in tip top shape. I have met him and stood no more that two feet away from him and his body is trim and taught.
    As much as I loved Maynard's playing he was a shell of his former self for the last 8-10 years. He was horribly over weight. I once saw him have to walk up a short flight of steps to get to the stage while Blue Birdland was playing. After he finished his high a at the end he was visibly out of breath. When he took the mic to speak he was still huffing and puffing.
    I have read that Doc is an avid exerciser and it shows. Doc was born a year before Maynard and looked 30 years younger. I can't help but think that Maynard would still be alive and playing his ass off if he had taken better care of himself.
    I've run for the last 35 years and done a lot of weight training. I don't play much these days due to job demands. I teach instrumental and classroom music in an arts magnet school. I have no real interest in gigging since I am usually in bed by 9-10 pm. When I retire I'll resume regular practicing. I know that my exercise routine has helped me stamina wise in my job and when I played/practiced on a regular basis it also helped. It also helps you look better. I'm 56 and can do 70 push ups non stop and most people think I'm in my early 40's. I work with mostly young very pretty female teachers and I never mind when they compliment me that I don't look my age!!
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

    8,040
    2,035
    Aug 16, 2009
    Jackson NC
    I'm 75, married, and in very declining health and still have younger women compliment me that I don't look my age. I could have often returned the compliment but decided against doing so as I didn't want them to consider that I was a lecherous old man or an adulterer. Too, I didn't want my wife to hear the gossip that I was hitting on other women. Thus, I just smile and say, "Thank you!" Such doesn't go to my head or inflate my ego as I plod on. Was nothing more than a friendly social courtesy.
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

    18,108
    9,262
    Jan 28, 2011
    Dayton, Ohio
    I don't know Ed, but if you told those women, they don't look a day over 75... not sure they would make many points.
     
  9. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

    8,040
    2,035
    Aug 16, 2009
    Jackson NC
    Whereas I did say it appeared that they were younger, I wouldn't dare say "they don't look a day over 75" as that would have been an insult. I certainly wouldn't tell my wife that either as I have the evidence that she IS younger than I. Too, I avoid being bashed by a woman's purse ... by any woman. I just got these dentures and paid a lot for them.
     
  10. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

    3,501
    2,304
    Oct 22, 2008
    Maryland
    Lots of good information by Gary and others.

    I'm going to back up and address the original question.

    First, let me say that I don't think the light jog helped your rubbery lips. You took a break, and your chops felt better. I think that's all that happened.

    However, I'm going to replace Mark's use of "cardio work" for "aerobic conditioning". If that's the question (if there were any particular benefit to "aerobic conditioning"), then the answer is yes.

    Let me explain. Playing the trumpet is an aerobic activity. It is equivalent to something between an easy walk and a brisk walk (around 2 to 6 METs). Aerobic conditioning makes the muscles you use to breath work more efficiently, and is sometimes called "functional capacity". So it makes sense that other aerobic activities could be beneficial for trumpet players.

    Mike
     

Share This Page