Casual Double High C - Any good?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by nestbeast, May 29, 2010.

  1. nestbeast

    nestbeast Pianissimo User

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    Jul 31, 2008
    Cultural black hole
    Thank you much. This is such good advice, particularly from a person with your professional experience. Its good to hear that there are no quick fixes - just time, patience and intelligent practice. I then take it that you recommend Casual Double C. With that, I'll give it a look.
    Again, thank you.
     
  2. Keith Fiala

    Keith Fiala Pianissimo User

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    Feb 21, 2007
    Austin, Texas
    Sure thing Nest - best of luck to you...

    Sincerely,

    Keith
     
  3. nestbeast

    nestbeast Pianissimo User

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    Jul 31, 2008
    Cultural black hole
    Thanks Keith.
    I have also started using the "pencil technique" method that I got from Trumpet college. I think that this will also help.
    I've listen to your clips - very good, very good. You have a great sound.
     
  4. reedy

    reedy Piano User

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    Jul 31, 2009
    Wiltshire, UK
    i use the pencil after my warm up, the stick out way not the above the lips way, this worked and is working really well for building muscle and has really helped my control especially with the low, long, quiet notes :)
     
  5. nestbeast

    nestbeast Pianissimo User

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    Jul 31, 2008
    Cultural black hole
    Thank you for your reply. I am also finding the pencil useful in building up muscle and control - I have only used it for a couple of days.
    Many good gigs for you.
    Peace.
     
  6. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    Sep 20, 2009
    New York State USA
    yeah, I stumbled onto Keith Fiala last year. I am comeback player at 45 with 7 yrs off. I use a lot of Keith's methods -- thick lips, small aperture, and fast air. Keith also let me know about Cat Anderson method ---- so my warmups are pretty much 2nd line g for 20 minutes. So it's been about a year. 2-3 hrs most days --- and finally I am getting a good DHC on a consistent basis --- BUT only after like an hour of warmups.
    Patience, and practice --- long tones softly (low and high notes), lip slurs, intervals - tonguing. Also don't forget about low F# --- get the whole thing!!! YOU CAN DO IT - BE PATIENT WITH YOURSELF ---CONSISTENT PRACTICE -- if it came overnight or was that easy -- trumpeters with a DHC wouldn't be so special -- would it??
     
  7. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    Sep 20, 2009
    New York State USA
    Sorry I really didn't answer your question about Bob Odneals book. I did talk about Cat Anderson -- you can print that free from Roddys trumpet site
    Roddy Trumpet's Home Page ---
    anyways -- that works for me --- I also use 3C+544 Asymmetric mpc which seemed to help teach me (small aperture, fast air, and helped retrain my 45 year old lips)
     
  8. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    Hi nestbeast,
    No I've not heard of that one but if you're intrested in playing in the stratosphere you might want to check out Arch Tongue and Hiss.
     
  9. nestbeast

    nestbeast Pianissimo User

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    Jul 31, 2008
    Cultural black hole
    Thank you much. I really appreciate your reply and encouragement.
     
  10. dhbailey

    dhbailey Piano User

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    Jul 28, 2009
    New Hampshire
    One thing I've found is that there is a wealth of information and material on playing high, from Caruso to Cat Anderson to Sail the 7 C's to Casual Double High C and on and on and on, and it's easy to drown in too much material.

    It all boils down to what Keith said -- air speed is the most important thing to concentrate on, not tight embouchure. And once you realize that and practice that, it comes down simply to what Rowuk said -- consistency in practice routine and patience.

    I had searched far and wide for the magic bullet to high notes, asking everybody I met who could play higher than I could how they developed their upper range. And for everybody I asked, I got a different story and different list of materials to work from, which I dutifully bought and they all ended up sitting on my bookshelf unused for many years because I grew frustrated at the lack of instant success.

    But thanks to the great advice I have read on TM and TH and the great inspiration of attending ITG last year in Harrisburg, I have abandoned my scattershot approach, jumping from method to method and have been doing the James Stamp Warm-ups daily for the past year, which has improved my air-flow and concept of tone production immensely as well as aided my upper register, and I am working through an old Jay Dorn book Exploring the Trumpet's Upper Register from Kendor Publications for specific upper register work. So pick a book and stick to it -- they all work if you do as they say and if you practice sensibly and regularly.

    The best bit of advice I can think of, in addition to what's already been offered is to simply choose a book and stick with it, working at it slowly and patiently and daily. The results come, not in any single huge increase in your upper range but rather in your ability one day to easily play a note that you had missed the day before. And then you find that new note is one you can hit consistently in piece after piece, and then after a few days or weeks or months more you find you get the next note and then the next note.

    You won't jump from a strained G above the staff to a gorgeous double-C in a single bound, but your range and confidence and tone quality will improve gradually. And while the upper range starts to grow you'll likely find that your lower range is improving in tone dramatically as well, since all trumpet playing is about air-flow.
     

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