Cerebral Hemorrhaging!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by soul3n, May 1, 2007.

  1. soul3n

    soul3n New Friend

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    So I was in my H.S. orchestra class today, and I told my director it was difficult for me to hit the higher notes and I told him that this uncomfortable pressure forms at the nose. Anyway he mentioned that this trumpeter by the name of Godfried Wright (SP?) died from cerebral hemorrhaging from having too much trouble playing the trumpet. He said he was playing a natural horn so it was alot harder to hit the different notes. I found it pretty interesting and I was searching some articles about pressure and cerebral hemorrhaging and didn't find anything. Plus I see all these pros playing all the double C's and such. It's kind of scary knowing that can happen if you try really hard to hit the notes. Kind of scared me away from trying. Just something to discuss.
     
  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    For more about Johann Sebastian Bach's trumpeter, Gottfried Reiche, see:
    Gottfried Reiche - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    He was pretty old when he died, and it didn't happen while playing, so we don't try to weasel more money when playing Bach because they're killer pieces in that respect. (They are killer pieces, to be sure, but mostly for the strings sitting in front of us!)

    Have fun!
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    If you do not have a history of blood disease, I would not worry about hemorraging. Some of the clarinet players may consider trumpet players with a double c brain dead, but that is their problem.......
    High notes require higher air pressure and that WILL be noticable to you. Practice lower notes more loudly and gradually increase your range. Nothing is for free, the bit of brute force needed to play a trumpet is not only a male thing though..........
     
  4. stchasking

    stchasking Forte User

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    I noticed that I have the high head pressure if I am caught chest breathing above the staff. Correct breath/air support should help prevent the head pressure.
    Some others should comment on this aspect of breath support.
     
  5. dcstep

    dcstep Mezzo Piano User

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    The worry is not "blood disease" but a family history of cardiovascular disease, such as high blood pressure, strokes and coronary artery disease. Even with a family history, a young person in high school has little to fear in most cases. (No fainting spells yet, right?)

    Dave
     
  6. soul3n

    soul3n New Friend

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    Mmm I've never fainted before, just dizzy spells.


    Does anyone have info on that guy that died from cerebral hemorrhaging as I mentioned before? or other cases? I just thought that was pretty interesting. People have asked me "doesn't that cause brain damage from all that pressure?" heh.
     
  7. Walter

    Walter Piano User

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  8. stchasking

    stchasking Forte User

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    Quincy Jones. His doctor told him to stop playing trumpet.
    Maybe he had high blood pressure?
     
  9. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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  10. soul3n

    soul3n New Friend

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    Anyway, the guy who died from Cerebral hemorrhaging was playing Brandenberg Sinfonia #2 for trumpet. Godfried Wright? (SP?) doesn't ring a bell?
     

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