change lead pipe

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by mlhend2002, Jul 18, 2009.

  1. mlhend2002

    mlhend2002 New Friend

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    Dec 30, 2008
    Salisbury, NC
    In 1998 I sold my 1969 Holton Al Hirt Special for a a 1985 King Silver Flair with 1st valve trigger. I bought the Al Hirt special at a house hold sale for $25 and got $50 for it at the a music instrument dealer. Eventhough it had some small dings and wear I kick myself for selling it. I also owned a 1979 Benge 3x and do own a 1955 Holton Super Collegiate.
    What I discovered is I overall play much better on trumpet with smaller bore (around .459). My King Silver Flair has a .463 bore. Does the lead pipe more or less determine the bore of a trumpet? By replacing my Lead pipe with .459 bore one, would I get the upper register range I had on my Holton trumpets? Also, by breaking the weld and reattaching another lead pipe produce a tarnished silver finish where it is done or is there other means of attaching it like gluing? Thanks for the advice.
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The leadpipe does not determine the bore, of course you could "glue" a new one on, but whether it stays attached is another story. Thin metal expands and contracts, that would break an epoxy bond. Silicone may withstand that BUT will damp vibrations, changing the horn. Solder is used for MANY reasons. A good tech can replace a leadpipe on a silver plated horn and you will hardly notice that anything has been done.

    You misunderstand bore. You do not play better on smaller bore instruments. You only have had a couple of examples that are not representative.

    Understanding bore is a complex issue. Generally it is measured at the second valve. That doesn't tell you anything either.

    The playing characteristics of the horn are not determined by the bore. They are primarily determined by the taper of the bell and leadpipe, position of the braces, thickness and type of metal, introduction of mass to certain parts of the horn. Manufacturers juggle parameters to meet the expectations of their customers. Some small bore horns are built very "free blowing". Others are built more efficiently.

    Due to the taper of the leadpipe and bell, the bore that the ad people talk about is only present in about 25% of the horn.

    You cannot determine performance by any numbers mortals understand. Meaningful trumpet specs are higher physics.

    Another point is the TLC in building the horn. We have a recent thread where a technician aligned the valves of a Bach pro horn and fixed the terrible intonation and blow. This only highlights how different the SAME horn could be.

    If you want to mess around, do so. It is part of the experience. Do not assume that you have figured anything out though. Changing the leadpipe is not a guarantee for anything except DIFFERENT.

    Buy a horn that plays right from the beginning. Trying to outguess professional designers only works when you get lucky. There are enough desasters out there too.

    Good luck.

    By the way, if you had done a search on "bore size" you would have discovered that your questions were already answered elsewhere. Search is VERY powerful feature here at TM, almost as good as google.
     
  3. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    I was working for a King dealer in the 80s. The King Silver Flair of the 80s was an intermediate horn in their line up. It had no relation to the Silver Flair they introduced in the 60s. That was a professional large bore horn and I used to own one. I think the bore was .464. The Al Hirt model you traded was a top of the line large bore .468 bore horn.
     
  4. mlhend2002

    mlhend2002 New Friend

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    Dec 30, 2008
    Salisbury, NC
    I'm learning and appreciate the comments. I will use the search engine more. After a horrible accident that left my top lip shreaded with 36 stitches (inside and out) I gave up trumpet playing. I was taught by a brillient trumpet player that also had an accident and became a Quadriplegic. Self Driven and determined to get back his movement in his legs and arms, which he did to a great degree, he pushed me to the breaking point. He taught me useing Arbans, Scholsberg, Clark and other books requiring me to play at least an hour a day, even when I went on vacation. I played solos for New York State Music Association (receiving a+ on everyone) starting in 7th grade and 1st chair in all County and State band. I broke my heart to have everything I put my time/effort/love get replaced with a lip that couldn't feel/play simple notes and scare tissue. I received scholarships from several big schools of music and saw them vanish a month later after my accident. I sold all of my trumpets, including a Benge 3x and Al Hirt Special because broke my heart to see them just sitting there. I say these things not for sympathy, but to get people to understand how much I love trumpet playing. After 10 years and plastic surgery on my lip I can finally play trumpet well, but not to the degree I use to...yet. I know I ask alot of "simple questions", but I want start all over again and build my knowledge of trumpet and once again become a great trumpet player. I plan on useing the search capabilities of this Thread and also thank you for your help/comments. Well, it's off to Arban, Scholsberg and Clark again.:thumbsup:
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    If you want to get back into playing, buy or borrow a hynmbook, a fake book, a book with folk tunes - anything with TONS of easy melodies and play them - hours at a time.

    Nothing builds new MUSICAL habits better than MUSIC. Arban, Clarke and Schlossberg are great fundementals builders, but tunes provide us with the beauty, the essense of why we play. I have worked with players after strokes where half of their face has NO feeling. TUNES was always the fastest way to get things back in order. The rewards and joy of a melody well played is far greater than Clarke#32 at quarter=152 - especially to other people listening.

    The finest players are "finest" because of placing musical expression first and technique second.
     

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