Change valve springs

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Daniel Nole, Apr 10, 2007.

  1. Daniel Nole

    Daniel Nole New Friend

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    Mar 29, 2007
    Switzerland
    Just curious, when can be necessary to change the valve springs?We take as example or depart point a normal-average trumpet player, playing so, one-two hours by day with a reasonable force in the digitation work.
    Maybe can be difficult to know the moment of change after so many time playing the same instrument;after longtime there are maybe a adaptation by the player to the more weakest mechanic answer of the instrument valves.

    And for the choice of the springs? Is better to use the examples copper coulour or the stainless steel versions? There are big differences between this two types ?Certainly they are some differences in the metallurgic and the mechanics factors of this materials.

    Thanks

    Daniel:play:

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  2. michaelm2

    michaelm2 New Friend

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    Mar 23, 2007
    Cleveland, Ohio
    Probably when the valve no longer comes up. I've got quite a few horns made anywhere from 1890s through the 1950s that are still using the original springs with no problem. I think you'll run into other problems with your horns before your springs wear out.

    Mike
     
  3. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Heart of Dixie
    The only valve springs I've seen wear out were some on an 80 year old trumpet that had rubbed the inside of the valve spring enclosure so much they had become thin and had lost much of their "spring".
     
  4. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    I had a clock spring on a very old (pre-WWI) rotary break. Other than that, no problems.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    As the valve wears, the friction between the valve and the casing goes down because less "contact" area is there (the viscosity of the oil does play a big part when the valve is new and tight). That means the mechanical friction goes down as the spring "wears" That is why you do not have any big problems noticing the difference until the valve is so worn that it starts binding.
     

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