Changing mouthpiece

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Nico Kelevra, Aug 26, 2012.

  1. Local 357

    Local 357 Banned

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    What kind of music does he play? That ought to be the first question.
     
  2. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Yes.
     
  3. fuzzyhaze

    fuzzyhaze Mezzo Piano User

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    Doesn't that go against the conventional received wisdom that says you should play on one mouthpiece for everything?
     
  4. Local 357

    Local 357 Banned

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    Wouldn't work on my gigs. Look at what the typical big band lead trumpet player goes through: By definition he is required to play at least two mouthpieces the second he picks up his flugel horn. While some cats insert a trumpet mouthpiece into the flugel it can sound odd this way. So the lead player is probably going to use a fairly shallow mouthpiece for all his High F's and G's then put in the very deep flugel piece when picking up the other ax.

    Sometimes one can substitute a cornet piece in the flugel as the shank is similar. I tend to use a medium deep cornet piece in my flugel. But either way its totally different than my lead scream piece.

    In today's world the average hard working cat who isn't particularly gifted range wise (which is most all of us) can't avoid using two pieces.

    I use about 5 average on a lead gig:

    1. One shallow Al Cass 3x4 but bored to #15 throat and a second cup I cut myself w/hobby lather.

    2. Same 3x4 mouthpiece but unaltered.

    3. 3x5 very shallow.

    4. 3x6 even shallower than that.

    5. Some kind of medium depth cornet piece for the flugel.

    All these pieces have the same rim contour. It is the rim contour that is most critical to keep constant.
     
  5. Nico Kelevra

    Nico Kelevra New Friend

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    Ok, if the question is for me, I play reggae and ska, but the studies that I have are not of that kind of music, as we know. But I don't think that the music be a problem. The question was to know if exist any problem doing that, I only play in my Bach 1 1/2 C and I see my other mp, the original that came with my trumpet and I made the question..

    Now, thanks to Gmonady, I know that is a good practice alternate diferents mp.

    Thanks to all of you

    Nico
     
  6. fuzzyhaze

    fuzzyhaze Mezzo Piano User

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    All these pieces have the same rim contour. It is the rim contour that is most critical to keep constant.[/QUOTE] Yes I understand what you are saying, I mean a classical trumpet player has to switch around on a lot of different trumpets too, so I suppose as long as the rim contour and width are fairly constant the depth (+backbore and throat) is what changes according to range requirements but having said that, that is not what gmonady was saying, so I am getting baffled by too much information!!!!
     
  7. trumpeterjake

    trumpeterjake Pianissimo User

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    Nothing wrong with having several mouthpieces...Lots of very good players do it. (But lots of very bad players also do it.) Just don't use them as a crutch for some bad habit or else it will get you in the end. You could also try something maybe in the middle as a all around mouthpiece? It depends on what kind of music you're mostly playing..
     
  8. Nico Kelevra

    Nico Kelevra New Friend

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    Well, I don't have several mp, and I just ask if is any problem with that change to know :dontknow:

    Again, thanks to all, and I think that I will keep playing my Bach :oops:

    Nico
     
  9. Local 357

    Local 357 Banned

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    Wouldn't appear to be a very easy Reggae or Ska gig on large m/pieces like those. Seriously unless you have some tone issues requiring such large mouthpieces I can't for the life of me understand why someone would use them.

    Typically Reggae or Ska involves amplified instruments no? OK so guess what happens to those beautiful lower harmonics the larger mouthpieces create once the P/A gets turned on? I'll answer that:

    They become inaudible. Now you're going to need 2 to 3 times the amount of embouchure and wind support just to project the sound out to an audience. This is the reason most trumpet players in dance, commercial and big bands get a far bigger sound with a shallower cupped mouthpiece.

    The shallower mouthpiece takes more skill but less effort than the bigger pieces.
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I have learned after being an Evidence-based Editor now for 3 medical publications and a healthcare insurer that conventional produces a dangerous constraint, and when connected to wisdom is anything BUT wise.

    I have been practicing what I preach over the past several months since acquiring 6 horns in a 6 month time period. Prior to this, I was playing the same two horns since the 1970s. I had the same flugelhorn mouthpiece since the '70s and played initially on a 10 1/2 C Bach, until 1979 when Claudio Roditi introduced me to Jerome Callet. Jerome hand made me a mouthpiece that I used through most of the next 20 years, until I discovered the Schilke which I used exclusively for the next 5 years on my Recording. I chose the mouthpieces I use less for their sizing characterizes then for the optimal sound they created with these two horns. Enter in the past 6 months, a '46 Committee, an LA Recording my refurbished Ambassador, and a Kanstul Flugelhorn. Each one has a mouthpiece that enhances the sound of the horn, from the largest Flip Oaks 3 flugelhorn mouthpiece for my Kanstul, to the constraining Olds 3 for the Committee and many sizes in between.

    I play each horn in rotation every night while practicing to keep the horns responsive. My lips have NEVER been stronger. Same practice routine, same length of practice time, same volume of gigs. The only variable is utilizing different size mouthpieces EVERY night when I play through EACH horn. I have never been more responsive; albeit does take me 4 bars to gain accuracy after finishing the Kanstul flugelhorn going to the Martin Committee. But the accuracy is rapid and the endurance is an order of magnitude greater.

    We just finished a four hour gig in Pittsburgh last evening and ended with Povo (I play it up an octave from Freddie's version) and popped it off like it was the first song of the evening. I could never have done this 6 months ago. Principles of muscle physiology applied to trumpet playing really works.
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2012

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