Changing mouthpieces for the job.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Stradbrother, Sep 9, 2015.

  1. feedback@stomvi-usa

    [email protected] Piano User

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    Newhall California
    The Stomvi multiple cup system discussed in 2 posts above is called a combi system. It offers a series of cup depths for the trumpet shank bottom ranging from A to F cups. The kit can be set up with flugelhorn or cornet shank bottom as the second bottom choice. The combi kit is not widely popular in the US market and is not listed on the Stomvi USA website. The Stomvi Flex mouthpieces are far more popular amongst US players.

    Estuche Combi System Trompeta / Ref. 8000 | Stomvi

    The combi kit is an interesting solution to finding different cups that provide the tonal qualities a player is trying to achieve. The combi system was not developed for commercial players it was developed as a solution for the player playing different trumpets Bb, C, D/Eb/ F, and Pic.

    The OP was being specific as to the one type of mouthpiece their teacher is interested in having them use.
    “My professor at my university wants me to play on a different mouthpiece for playing lead jazz and solos in marching band”.
    This points to a commercial mouthpiece as it applies to this individual. Based on the rest of the OP’s comments the recommendations offered guides the OP towards mouthpieces in their rim diameter that are medium depth as apposed to shallow. This is a logical place for them to start.

    Best,

    Jon
     
  2. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    WHY?

    Seems to me it is not popular BECAUSE it is not listed - most US players that I told about the system had never heard about it before and, when they tried it, were very happy with it. kinetic711 is a prime example.

    Stomvi should perhaps market the system more aggressively, as for many players, it is the perfect solution. And I respectfully disagree with Jon's statement that it is not for the commercial player - it is the professional, be it symphonic, commercial or whatever, that needs a wide range of colours most. And here in Austria and Germany, many professionals rely on some sort of combi system. So Stomvi, here's a challege for you!
     
  3. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I think that the ends justify the means. I was a "one mouthpiece fits all" player when I was younger up into my mid 20s. Then I started playing in a Latin band and I was working myself half to death on the fairly large mouthpiece I was using to try to do it.

    At that point I started messing around with a Schilke 14A4a that had been given to me by a friend of mine when I got a piccolo trumpet. I'd do the whole switch-er-roo thing when I thought I needed the help on a high, zippy line - a practice that truly wasn't working very well in retrospect.

    It came to a head one night when I rolled up to the Latin band job and realized I'd left my regular mouthpiece in my bugle case at work, (at the time I was in the Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps as a bugler) and I had no choice but to roll with the mouthpiece I did have in the case - the Schilke 14A4a. The first set was pretty rough but by the end of the night I was playing ok on it, and I never looked back. For that kind of playing, I wanted a mouthpiece that facilitated both a brighter sound, and facilitated easier range and endurance.

    I don't know if you are still doing a concert type of format for performances, but there's definitely a difference between playing 15 or so tunes for a concert and playing 40ish tunes a night on a 3 set gig. If you're already gigging down that road, you'll know what I'm talking about. Once you hit that, you'll want a mouthpiece that lets you get the job done as easy as possible because for most of us mere mortals, a 3 set gig can be quite a blow.

    It's up to you, but within reason, I definitely agree with your professor.
     
  4. Claude Gnocchi

    Claude Gnocchi Mezzo Forte User

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    I don't disagree w/the professor totally, but let's remember that Arturo Sandoval does ALL his playing from pedal tones to triple high C on a Bach 3C......& Wynton, of course, can't change his built-in Monette mouthpiece either........
     
  5. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    Is it built in, or threaded (screw-on) in?
     
  6. Leslie Colonello

    Leslie Colonello Pianissimo User

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    Good advice BenArt. It has to feel the same no matter how deep the cup. And as for " the professor" telling you what to do Stradbrother, realize this; he lives in an academic bubble, not the real world. If you are lucky enough to become a professional, you will find your way on your own. My trumpet teacher in college steered me to bad mouthpiece choices. After college I became a professional and have played a trumpet for a living in New Orleans for the last 32 years. No one can tell you what to do or how to do it like your own experience. Right now you are under the thumb of a very influential educator. Man, I wish I can tell you all the things I didn't learn in music school!
     
  7. Leslie Colonello

    Leslie Colonello Pianissimo User

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    Right on Claude
     
  8. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    I was lucky enough to never have a teacher who would "tell" me what equipment to use. Sure, many of them were enthusiastic about some mouthpiece and instrument choice like..."Man, this mouthpiece is great for that kind of stuff" but never tried to force my own decisions about it. It was more like sharing ideas and impressions, than dictating choice. I guess I was a lucky student.

    Well, most of them were real professionals, who taught in their spare time...
     
  9. Claude Gnocchi

    Claude Gnocchi Mezzo Forte User

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    I'm not a Monette owner, so I don't really know, but I believe that the mouthpiece is part of the leadpipe.
     
  10. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    I saw a video where on the new rajna mouthpieces are scewed on...
     

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