Chem Cleaning and Ultrasonic Cleaning

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by ccb_22, Sep 30, 2010.

  1. lmf

    lmf Forte User

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    Will the ultrasonic units clean dentures, too? Just teasing! ;-)

    Lloyd
     
  2. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    You can get jewelry sized ones, so I would guess that they would.


    The shop I work at doesn't have an Ultrasonic machine, but at repair school we had one of the tuba sized ones. I never had issues with it affecting horns other than the "shark attack" that could occur from rouge coming off of the horn.

    I don't think an ultrasonic cleaning is needed all the time, but maybe once per year to get the stuff that normal snakes can't get to.
    The chemicals also are less harsh than the decalcifiers/descalers used, so you won't get as much dezincification from the process.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2010
  3. glorybe

    glorybe Piano User

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    I suspect that players feel that more design is going into horns than actually takes place. There is just way too much evidence already existing that metals make no difference in the design and operation of a trumpet. Expert players have been double blind tested and they can not tell when horns are changed or the materials in the horns are different. A brass bell a bronze bell or a silver bell both when tested with the best acoustic devices as well as the greatest players hearing abilities are the same. So just how can the hardness of the bell matter? Obviously all of these materials have different hardnesses. If these ideas of materials were real the fiberglass sousaphones would not have worked out at all. There is a current euphonium that has a steel bottom bow as denting of the bottom bow is such a common problem. Frankly the bell could be of steel as well and the tone would never suffer one bit.
     
  4. Brekelefuw

    Brekelefuw Fortissimo User

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    Fibreglass sousaphones sound horrible compared to brass ones. I play sousaphone on as many, if not more gigs than trumpet these days, and have played both fibreglass and brass ones.

    Is the whole bow on the euphonium steel, or just the bow guard?
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    My most precious horns are regularly cleaned by hand with lukewarm, soapy water and elbow grease. There is no reason for me to use ANYTHING stronger.

    I have reservations on what ultrasound could do to a top quality horn. For anything less than top, there probably will be little difference. This is why cryogenics is also not something that I am willing to invest in without real proof.

    In any method, there is always some truth and advantage. I am simply not willing to risk my players to prove a point.............
     
  6. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    The precautions of utilizing ultrasound, I'd leave to that which is broken and in need of repair. If it works why fix it.

    Will ultrasound change the tone of the metal in an instrument? Yes, I'll say it is possible in the extremely high ranges of ultrasound. Science knows these upper ranges are possible but the cost and size of the power unit is prohibitive along with available safety shielding.
     
  7. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    My Branson would be the right size ultrasound unit, but pearls dissolve in such. The metal of my denture might shine, but will the teeth attached to it still remain? Polident tablets does fine, thank you.
     
  8. Frankie Prive

    Frankie Prive New Friend

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    Totally agree with this as there is a commercial process in mechanical engineering for treating metals that I've used in the past called ultrasonic stress relieving. This is a room temperature process that uses ultrasonic resonance generated by a clamp on bit of kit that produces a high frequency vibration to relieve stresses in metals.
     
  9. glorybe

    glorybe Piano User

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    I think I would be concerned for the soldered joints more than the metal itself. For example the older Olds horns used silver solder and silver solder does not like vibration at all. It is strong but not in regard to vibration. The other issue would relate to different metals and the solder vibrating at different frequencies. Milder ultra sonic cleaning might be a better
    idea.
     

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