Chez Cornet

Discussion in 'EC Downloading' started by ecarroll, Aug 29, 2005.

  1. ecarroll

    ecarroll Artist in Residence Staff Member

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    I had the honor and pleasure of teaching at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory for two weeks back in the mid 1990's at the invitation of Mravinsky's legendary trumpeter, Veniamin Margolin. In addition to hearing some of the loudest trumpet students anywhere (Brantissimo!), I also enjoyed many vodka soaked conversations with Prof. Margolin covering stories of the old Leningrad Philharmonic, our students, and the state of world trumpet playing. A pattern emerged in these conversations: names such as Bud Herseth, Maurice Murphy, and Peter Masseurs were always identified by Margolin as "great trumpeters" while names such as Maurice André, John Wallace, Timofey Dokshitzer, and Reinhold Friederich emerged as "great cornetists". It was obvious that this distinguished Russian orchestral trumpeter considered all trumpet soloists as "cornetists", in spite of rarely performing on our conical cousin.

    This made me pause. . . are all soloists cornetists at heart? Is the range of technique needed to perform solo works by Berio, H.K. Gruber, Max Davies, Tomasi, and others a throwback, of sorts, to the extended virtuosity of Kryl, Staigers, and Clarke?

    Taking this thought one step further, might the collection of instruments that emerged in the second half of the 20th Century (Eb, G, piccolo A/Bb, flügelhorn) be an unconscious attempt to counter the brilliance (and volume) of our Bb and C trumpets with a more cornet-like intimacy appropriate for most solo and chamber music settings? Could the same be said of the use of the harmon, cup, and plunger in our favorite jazz clubs?

    Food for thought. I think that I might try eating at Chez Cornet tonight. I hear that the doodle tongue is excellent.

    EC
     
  2. Veldkamp

    Veldkamp Piano User

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    :lol:

    Nice post, I just saw a older video of Hakan playing cornet. I sounded pretty awesome, just like his piccolo playing.
     
  3. trumpetmike

    trumpetmike Forte User

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    I find it fascinating that Maurice Murphy is listed in the trumpet camp - his history is more steeped in cornet playing than just about anybody else in the brass world.
    He plays cornet like a cornet player and trumpet like a trumpet player - and quite a good one in both cases :D
     
  4. ecarroll

    ecarroll Artist in Residence Staff Member

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    Mike,

    I've heard that Maurice is a terrific cornetist, as you mention. The point, however, is that Margolin was making a distinction between techniques from his unique (and personal) perspective. From the other side of the coin, John Wallace sounded pretty good in the Philharmonia as did Reinhold in the Frankfurt Radio Orchestra.

    Labels. . .you gotta love 'em

    Cheers,
    EC
     
  5. TrentAustin

    TrentAustin Fortissimo User

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    Oct 28, 2003
    Boston, MA
    Ed,

    I'll speak from a jazz musician's angle for a second.

    I know personally the art of playing plunger mute is nearly dead... thanks to guys like Clark Terry and Snooky Young they passed 1/1000th of their amazing technique on to me.

    Wynton and his LC guys are keeping it happening to as Wynton is simply an AMAZING plunger player.

    CT always told me to make the horn talk with it, to emulate the human voice and try to achieve tonal and emotional changes with the mute. I've learned how to "cuss" now to, and that's always helpful when you're ticked at the concert promoter or your manager mid-gig ;)!

    I would have to think that cornet and the intimacy it lends itself to naturally is also another hidden treasure. I know "younger" jazz players like myself initially were turned off to the cornet. HIGHER FASTER LOUDER just isn't as cool on a cornet (which I know now is not the case).

    I have really found an entirely new "voice" on my Olds Opera Cornet... it's a spiritual bond with a horn I can't describe. The sound that comes out is so rich and is completely different than the trumpet. I'm anxious to hear in a few hours how the horn sounds different on a recording. It might not sound that much different in front of the bell but from behind it's an amazing experience.
     
  6. davidjohnson

    davidjohnson Piano User

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    Nov 2, 2003
    arkansas
    doodle tongue...heh heh heh
    what other delicasies are served at said 'chez cornet'?
    i think a sliver of non-pressurized top lip would be tasty...
    with a mendez cola fizz!

    dj
     
  7. ecarroll

    ecarroll Artist in Residence Staff Member

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    Jul 13, 2005
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    DJ,

    Chef Louis recommends his Cornet Chop Suey

    :oops:
    EC
     
  8. Tootsall

    Tootsall Fortissimo User

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    Oct 25, 2003
    Yee HAW!
    To hear Clark Terry explain the doodletongue, go to http://www.artistshousemusic.com and then click the links for "Media", "Master", "Clark Terry", "Lesson 1". Lots o' good stuff at that website.
     
  9. TrentAustin

    TrentAustin Fortissimo User

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    Boston, MA
    mmmm tastes like chicken!

    don't forget your piano rolls, served with garlic sauce.

    Best,

    t
     
  10. davidjohnson

    davidjohnson Piano User

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    Nov 2, 2003
    arkansas
    :D chuckle, shudder, fall, rofl
     

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