Chop Recovery

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by BFlinch83, Jun 4, 2006.

  1. BFlinch83

    BFlinch83 Pianissimo User

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    Dec 12, 2005
    Baltimore, MD
    What do you do after a week of really loud, low playing to get yourself back in shape? I was thinking I need to do a lot of soft midrange work, like Clarke or Colin. Any suggestions?
     
  2. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    That sounds like a good idea to me. Although, next time, do that stuff for your warm-up and practicing when you have the low loud playing to do.

    Oh, hey, one of my MYS kids is going to Peabody next year on clarinet. If you're still there next year, look her up and say Hi. She's a bit of a Nervous Nellie when she's in a new place. Her first name is Kristine. She's a good kid.

    ML
     
  3. BFlinch83

    BFlinch83 Pianissimo User

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    Baltimore, MD
    Hey, no problem, Manny! I'm not a student anymore, but I'm still around the area. Is she studying with Steve Barta?

    And yeah...good idea doing this 'recovery' work before it becomes a problem. I never played so low and loud in my life.
     
  4. wiseone2

    wiseone2 Artitst in Residence Staff Member

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    PUT YOUR HANDS UP!

    STEP AWAY FROM THAT SHINY THING!

    DON'T TOUCH IT FOR A DAY.................. TOMORROW............SOFT AND LOW TONES.
    It works for me :cool:
    Wilmer
     
  5. Eclipsehornplayer

    Eclipsehornplayer Forte User

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    Metro Detroit
    Interesting post!

    I'll have to bear these things in mind.

    As a third section player in my community band I play loud and low alot. So I usually have no problems playing my full range no matter what I do. Maybe it's just because that's what I do I don't know.

    I'll be mindful of what's been said here and apply it to my practicing.
     
  6. BFlinch83

    BFlinch83 Pianissimo User

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    Dec 12, 2005
    Baltimore, MD
    Good advice, but does it still work if my trpt isn't shiny? :oops:
     
  7. robertwhite

    robertwhite Mezzo Piano User

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    Nov 11, 2003
    What'd you play?
     
  8. Derek Reaban

    Derek Reaban Mezzo Piano User

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    Jun 16, 2005
    Tempe, Arizona
    Brent,

    I’m sure you’ve heard all of this before, but sometimes a refresher is worthwhile. I’ve dealt with the loud, low playing issues that you describe and identify that as a “danger zone†in my own playing (I’m sure many players share this same perspective).

    I wrote something called Focused Awareness (When Things are Going Well and Not So Well) a while ago. If you read the first two posts I think you will shake your head in agreement.

    In addition to my experience, here’s what David Krauss said at the ITG conference in Denver:
    When you have a ringing, vibrant, resonant sound, it will get out into the hall easily. When you play “louderâ€, it may appear to be louder behind the bell (and to those in a small radius around you), but if you go past a certain point you are actually going to add a small amount of tension that will begin to affect the higher overtones in your sound. Those are the exact components that help carry your sound easily to the back of the hall and allow you to get the job done with much less effort. There’s more about this in a topic called Sound Experiment.

    "The louder you play, the less it carries! In my opinion, the quality that carries is the amplification of the dolce tone."

    Marcel Tabuteau - The Philadephia Orchestra
     
  9. BFlinch83

    BFlinch83 Pianissimo User

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    Dec 12, 2005
    Baltimore, MD
    Thanks for the posts.

    Bob--I was playing second cornet on Tchaik Manfred. The part isn't hard, but it sure is loud and low!
     
  10. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Try warming down with some ghost tones: play a long tone and dimm. on down to the point that the sound doesen't really leave the bell and hold it there a while. Then shortly afterwards take a shot of single-malt scotch and enjoy the burning sensation on your cracked lips.
     

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