Chops

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by RobertSlotte, Jul 7, 2011.

  1. RobertSlotte

    RobertSlotte Pianissimo User

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    Big relaxed breath, play for about 15 minutes. Rest 30 minutes. Play for about 15 minutes and again; rest 30 minutes, repeat!

    In other words practice MUCH but DO NOT practice on tired lips.

    This works for me and maby others could find it useful too.

    I know, Everyone is Different. Thats why I said: "This works for me"
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2011
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  2. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    I think that the most important thing is to just listen to what your chops are telling you. I think that some people take the whole, "no pain, no gain" thing a little too seriously and they do wind up over-practicing. That's just not a great thing to do, but so many people do it.
     
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  3. amzi

    amzi Forte User

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    Got to go with Patrick here, don't over tax your chops; but it's been my experience that the people who adhere to things like 15 minutes on 30 minutes off practice schedules end up having 15 minutes of endurance. I've run into those who practice 2+ hours a day in 15 or 20 minute increments and most (not all) of them can't make it through a 2 hour concert. Just sayin' you don't train to run a mile by only practicing in 100 meter increments.
     
  4. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    I guess Bud Herseth must have had poor endurance.
    Herseth would practice in 45 minute sessions, resting as much as he played. He would also take 10 minutes off after the first 15 to 20 minutes of playing.
    Here is a link to O.J. Utnes site with Tim Kent's notes from his years with Herseth.
    Herseth lesson notes
    Maybe if more folks on this site followed some of this advice, they might actually improve and learn a few things. We make more into it than is necessary.
    Sorry to be a bit nasty and this is not directed at anyone, but some things need to be said in a straightforward manner.
    Rich T.
     
  5. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    One thing from the Herseth lesson notes

    """There is nothing wrong with your chops, your mind is messing them up. High register is no more physical than low, it should be as easy and sound just as good. Don't make such an issue of it. This habit must be worked out and will eventually go away, however there is only one way to get rid of this bad habit, and that is to apply concepts every day in your playing""

    sorry to be a bit nasty and this................

    YES - but you got to be strong enough to hold the aperture together -- and that doesn't happen overnight



    c'mon people if you want endurance -- then put the face to the horn and play -- I was at a Chuck Mangione concert in 1989. Chuck played for over 2 hours -- and he had songs that were 15 -18 minutes long (all ranges, and all dynamics, and all speeds) -- the dude only took about 2 minutes rest between songs (thank people, tell what the next song was, and that was it) ---- something tells me that he didn't practice 10 minutes on 10 off -- that he must have done more ---- but then again it was a fluglehorn and maybe that made playing easier --- yeah right!!!!
     
  6. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    I think a good analogy would be aerobic training vs anaerobic. You can develop great technique with the short sessions, but you need to do some power training as well.

    Practice how you play.

    Sometimes you have to let the horse out of the barn and let him run like hell.
     
  7. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    +1 Patrick ... I rest as much as I need to in between exercise to be able to play the next passage ... at some point it's time to put the horn away.
     
  8. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    +1 -- and I suspect some trumpet players will naturally do well in a marathon long songs, and others well at high range, and others well rythmically, and maybe some of that is genetics, some is practice, and some is positive mental training --- :thumbsup:
     
  9. amzi

    amzi Forte User

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    Clarke said rest when you get tired. He also said playing softly builds endurance. And I seem to remember something about if you play using the correct technique after a couple of hours you should be as fresh when you started (that may have been from Arban or another book I used). I'm not sure I agree with any of those statements except the first one. Herseth may have practiced only 45 minutes a day, but how long did he spend in rehearsal?
    When I was young playing 2 shows a night and working on the new one every afternoon I didn't spend much time practicing either--but I spent a lot of time with that mouthpiece in my face. It really is unfair to apply a working pro's standard of practicing to an amateur or part-timer.
     
  10. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    KT, I think that a distinction has to be made between practice and performance. Sure, Chuck could do a 2 hour gig. I can do 3 sets worth of charts, really blowing it down at the end and still have chops left over (4 hour gig, 3 hours worth of music) but that's not how I practice.
     

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