Chops

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by RobertSlotte, Jul 7, 2011.

  1. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    I think it may be useful to know that Robert does perform at a reasonably high level. Getting through 2 hours is not an issue.

    This is a good place to talk about getting a life. While it is true that we usually CAN make pracice sessions compact and get most of what we need to do into single, max 2 sessions, you should think about the possibilities of taking longer breaks.

    I often criticize "not thinking" or beating up the chops. IF we have the luxury of time (and we probably do more often than we realize), then I believe Roberts way has GREAT advantages - not only in keeping the chops fresh, but also the mind. Concepts can sink in BEFORE being repeated. Questions can be intelligently dealt with without interfering with the practice flow. We get used to practicing without pressure.

    I recommend that some of you try something this extreme. You may learn something about yourself.
     
  2. brian moon

    brian moon Forte User

    2 hours and enough clams to open a seafood market.
     
  3. Al Innella

    Al Innella Forte User

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    +1,I've been a big advocate of resting for as long you play for years now. If done softly,this greatly helps in building range and endurance.

    Beating yourself up for an hour or two only hinders your progress,because as you tire,bad habits have a way sneaking into your playing,plus it tears you down more than build you up.
     
  4. RobertSlotte

    RobertSlotte Pianissimo User

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    Of course "stuff" often gets in the way and one simply have to practice when there is time. Also the 15 minutes / 30 minutes is not written in stone for me but the point being : not to practice on wasted chops if you want to build up.

    Ah, the horn is calling. Time for another 15 minutes ;)
     
  5. SmoothOperator

    SmoothOperator Mezzo Forte User

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    The mind goes first, shortly followed by the chops.
     
  6. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    IMO practice is rife with a redo of many basics and some challenges. This seems to become merely a warm-up for pros who then focus on rehearsing the songs they've been called upon to perform ... or just want to perform. I'd never attach "professional" to my own capability to play, but I've had sessions where the song was over twenty minutes in length ... but haven't yet seen one that long where I was required to play all that time on any one or more of my different instruments. Too, I've played in quite a few circumstances where the entire program repertoire ran as long as two and a half to three hours including an intermission of a half hour.
     
  7. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    Patrick - yes I practice with "the rest as much as you play" for the most part -----but I am not sure I could play for 2 hours with only a minute or two of rest between sets. I am just not convinced the endurance would be there. Maybe it is genetics, age, and arguably I am only in the 31st month of a comeback -- and a lot of you guys who perform have pretty much been playing for 10,20, or more years. All I notice is when I Practice a Performance (one that I haven't even had yet - silly me?¬ LOL) - after about 45 or so minutes the range really starts to erode --- that is whether I play high, low, or whatever. So my limit of decent reproduceable sound, 85% of my range, is not even an hour yet. (and that is with 3000 hours of play time for those 31 months)
     
  8. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    I don't think anyone plays 45 minutes continuously without problems but that is what you infer you've been doing. As previously I stated, longer songs such as symphonies do not require continuous playing throughout on any wind instrument. Club and wedding dance songs at best do not normally exceed 5 minutes whereas the dancers too have to rest. After a 40 year lapse, it took me a year to be able to play 5 minute songs without over exertion. Then my brass efforts fell apart with dental and life threatening health issues. Now I'm presently playing no better than a young student ... but I'm enjoying the heck out of it and improving day by day.
    My practice regimen is now to play for 20 minutes, but not continuously as I switch from element to element, then I rest for 20 minutes as in a 2 hour session I've actually played less than 1 hour. One point is that I've no criteria on my time that induces stress and hampers my playing ... a nice benefit of retirement. There are some days I now even take an afternoon nap as could really put a player in better condition for an evening gig.
     
  9. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    YES - Ed, that maybe pushing it to the extreme, but putting the face to the horn and playing for 45 minutes (mostly in the staff and below) seems to help with my endurance. NOT to say that is realistic -- and I understand that short rests are inherent in most any gig --- BUT my recollection of some of the concerts I attended in the past of horn players with awesome stamina ie. Chuck Mangione, Phil Driscoll (although after an hour or so phil would sing) -- these guys were incredible--- and in a 2 hour + show they would take few breaks and none much longer than a couple of minutes, but they would play many songs in the 10-15 minute ranges.
    Perhaps that is an unrealistic assumption on my part that in a comeback at 46 -- I would somehow be able to "increase" stamina -- in my chops in just a year or two.
    I guess I just wonder how these guys play for an hour or so -- with the whole range, dynamics and such --- without taking much of a break.
    Again -- with trickg and others -- realistically I understand there are usually song breaks in most gigs.:thumbsup:
     
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    KT, I just want to change your "incredible" to "amazing", for certainly these performers you mention are very credible and they earned such accolades, just like hundreds (thousands???) more equally so.

    I can only suggest that joining a church or community band will expose you to the real world of performance, albeit there is very little or no money in doing so ... and quite often one must endure fellow players whose playing skills are the extreme opposite of the ones you've mentioned and would appreciate your help towards improving.

    As a warm-up I often practice the chromatics from the top line of the bass (F clef) (A) to the bottom line of the treble (G clef) (E) in various forms, slurs, staccato, etc and note types ... and though many advanced training books have shown 1/64th notes, and I've yet to see such in any song for trumpet, and I just can't wrap a clear run of them, as they only sound like a "blip" ascending and a "wump" descending. I once thought I would faint while playing a continuous drone on my euphonium in 4/4 time for 8 measures of an arrangement I have for We Three Kings Of Orient Are. No way will I attempt it again with my health decline. I've yet to even consider playing my euphonium again until I feel much better.
     

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