Chris Botti Net Worth $ 8,000,000 in 2011

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Chuck Cox, Dec 22, 2011.

  1. SFPat

    SFPat Pianissimo User

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    Great for Chris. Good to see a musician able to make a living plying his trade.
     
  2. veery715

    veery715 Utimate User

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    You don't have to like it, but to put him down thusly is somewhat offensive to those of us who do enjoy what he does. Because his music is accessible does not mean he panders to his fans.

    If you truly don't get it, that should be a signal to you to be circumspect in your criticism. Sour grapes. Says a lot about you, Satch, and not much about anything else.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    You are absolutely right - you don't get it. Many of us do and that should tell you something. Reducing him to right place/right time is pretty naive. I think that we get your point. I hope that you get ours.
     
  4. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Playing the trumpet won't make us all wealthy, but it can make both the listener and the player richer.
     
  5. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    I'm with SB. Just not seeing the huge fan base for someone so ordinary (among professionals, that is).

    No, I'm not jealous. Being a "rock star" trumpet player has its downside.
     
  6. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    Yep, AND I noticed James Morrison's bio included him singing songs, and born in UK....so maybe between both James Morrisons' you get the bucks; what if they included Jim Morrison...


    I am sure Tom would look after his kin,:-)
     
  7. Kujo20

    Kujo20 Forte User

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    I can understand where some people would see Chris as the "Kenny G" of trumpet. A lot of his older albums have that style of music. However that doesn't make him the Kenny G of trumpet.

    I even thought of him as that kind of trumpeter until his Live in Boston album came out. THEN I went to see him live in Grand Rapids and he put on the best concert I've ever seen. For a long time I thought his incredible sound had some "studio magic" surrounding it...but I was WRONG.

    At the concert he did an encore without a mic and he sounded the same. Plus, the concert in itself showed that he can play more than "smooth jazz" and "easy listening". He did his rendition of "The Look of Love" with a female singer (don't remember name but not the same gal from the Boston gig)...at one point Botti was in an improv solo and he started busting out some seriously legit jazz (including licks from Gillespie's Manteca)...It. Was. Incredible. I gained a LOT of respect for Chris at that concert.

    Kujo
     
  8. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    +1 (same experience here)
     
  9. trumpettrax

    trumpettrax Piano User

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    I'm glad to hear someone say that he didn't use the "studio magic". I was talking to someone recently that said it's easy to play smooth jazz because it's all about the (what you call studi magic) stuff used to make the player sound good. "Anyone can play that way, all you need to know is how to play the songs".

    I just didn't get that. I haven't been to any of Chris' concerts YET! but I've seen him on the television live and I didn't really hear the studio magic stuff. Maybe I don't listen well enough, but didn't hear it.
     
  10. kadleck

    kadleck Artist in Residence Staff Member

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    Money aside, because I think that's a pretty ridiculous barometer, Chris is an excellent musician. I had the pleasure of working with him in the late 80's and early 90's in NYC before he became a solo artist. He is a down to earth, humble guy. His improvisational abilities go far beyond what he leaves on the stage at his concerts. He can play to the situation, not just "play everything at all times". It seems to be fashionable to bash him, but he's a bad dude!

    TK
     

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