Chromatic Scales in Sight Reading for school band

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Passion, Nov 23, 2009.

  1. Passion

    Passion Pianissimo User

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    Jun 11, 2009
    so im a senior in high school. I just had an audition. I played higher than all the trumpets. I played Eb two ocataves, and held the high Eb a bit. when decending, i messed up twice. I had good tone still.

    All the other trumpets played C scale two ocataves, or lower than that. i however just mafe minor mistake in 2 notes.

    Can i still get more points on chromatic scale because i played higher, and didnt do that same old C scale everyone else does?

    And how is chromatic scale graded. I was told range is a factor, so i played the higest i could with full tonation and good sound. Higher than above that my sound is thin.

    I played a more difficult chromatic than them at least.
     
  2. abtrumpet

    abtrumpet Pianissimo User

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    Nov 14, 2009
    Depends... were you auditioning for lead playing? If so you might get some credit. However if it's more of a symphonic setting you might get slated for it. Scales are weighted differently by everyone but I'd generally think the audition piece would be the deciding factor.
     
  3. dizforprez

    dizforprez Forte User

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    Anytime you are graded, be it college, high school, or whatever, learn how you are graded and how things are quantified BEFORE the test.

    If the director graded on the "district system" it could be one point per correct octave with any mistake meaning 0 points for that octave, so your chromatic scale offered you more chances to mess up, but no room to score more than the other players playing a major scale....all depends on how and what is scored.....always ask for a rubric!
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2009
  4. actionjackson06de

    actionjackson06de New Friend

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    Nov 22, 2009
    University of North Texas
    Know what the director or judge values the most. I'm a senior at the University of North Texas and one of my professors, Keith Johnson, has said several times "right notes are highly overrated," meaning that there are much more important things such as intonation, quality of sound and phrasing that one might overlook if you concern yourself too much with getting every single note correct. Now, granted, the ultimate goal is to get the "notes and rhythms" down pat so that you can use all your focus on the "musical" elements, but don't over-think the notes.
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Oh, oh, oh.

    There is sooooo much more to points than high and non cracked notes. Tone, rhythm, musicality all come immediately to mind before those two.

    If the judge was looking for a big crescendo going up and a big decrescendo going down, you may have missed the entire point..........
     
  6. Passion

    Passion Pianissimo User

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    Jun 11, 2009
    I never cracked my high notes. I played it fine, I just played wrong note twice when playing the second octave. And my high Eb isn't cracked or thin tone. I played it because my directors said they would like to have an idea where our range was, and how good our intonation was. I think I had good tone on the scale though.

    They never said to get all fancy with our chromatic scale with sticatto, crescendos and all that. I slurred it all, and went at a steady pace.
     
  7. Passion

    Passion Pianissimo User

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    Jun 11, 2009
    This isn't for jazz band. This is for concert band 1st chair.
     
  8. Pedal C

    Pedal C Mezzo Forte User

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    Jan 24, 2005
    Making mistakes in a scale is simply poor preparation. Slightly less range coupled with excellent preparation will usually come out ahead in a high school audition.
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    When you are a judge, many "unsaid" tings flow into ratings. Ability to lead is not measurable during an audition, but perhaps noted during other ensemble work. Heck, there are judges that don't like girls in lead positions. They will never give you that in writing though.
    If you think that you have not been treated fairly, just ask nicely.

    Sometimes showing off does not show any quality except ego.

    We cannot judge your audition because we only have your side and no "objective" info. If the decision preferred someone else, there was a reason. No need to speculate or defend yourself on the web.

    My lead players in band don't need a high Eb, they need a certain type of personality and excellent allround capabilities. Missing a note on a chromatic scale shows inadequate preparation. A cracked note would be preferable in my book.
     
  10. Passion

    Passion Pianissimo User

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    Jun 11, 2009
    I was trying to show my good tone in upper range cause I thought it might get me more points. Somehow I messed up, even though I really knew the scale and practiced it alot. My judge knows I'm not egotistical and wasnt trying to show off.

    He also isn't a chauvistic sexist jerk. He's actually my trumpet teacher, but wouldn't give me lessons because he thought it would give me advantage over other audtioners. He wrote on recondmendation to get me into Honor Band that I had good section leader and soloist abilities. He also said I was very determined and hard working, showing vast improvement recently.

    And I dont have a big personality or anything, and dont see how that matters for school concert band anyways. I'm actually pretty shy unfortunately, and I'm a girl, I play lead parts in Jazz bands that I'm in. And inside the youth jazz orchestra im in, in some songs, I have to constantly hit E'bs, and sometimes the music calls for getting up to high F or above.

    In school jazz band, in my part is written a high F#. I usually dont play that high in school though. But there was a girl trumpet player before me who could do it, and she was an amazing lead, the best there ever was at our school.

    The thing is the teachers say other factors dont come into audition, just your performance. Though I'm not so sure. A kid 2 years ago messed up on his chromatic scale like I did, but he still ended up with 1st chair. I heard his audition as well as the other trumpets. I remember his though because I was wondering how he got away with the mistake, though he was really good.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2009

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