Chronic Dry Mouth....

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by motteatoj, Mar 6, 2014.

  1. motteatoj

    motteatoj Mezzo Forte User

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    I take a few meds that give me VERY VERY bad dry mouth.
    I drink water constantly all day.
    But sometimes, no matter what, my mouth goes very dry, esp when playing.

    Any solutions, tips, tricks are greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Interesting question. There are some over-the-counter saliva substitutes. I'm hoping our tame doctors will chime in.
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    There are many medications in the allergy, neurology and mental health that do this. With that said, we have alternate medications for the same response desired but with the minimal "side effect" of dry mouth. An example, Benadryl - a GREAT allergy medication, but does dry the mouth. Alternate: Loratadine - same great allergy response albeit with a more delayed onset of action, but no dry mouth. If you have yet asked you doctor, I would go to him/her, and let them know you are a trumpet player and if there is an alternate medication you could try.

    We have a saying in medicine as to how you can tell a well seasoned physician from a newbie:

    A well seasoned uses one drug to treat many diseases.
    A newbie uses many drugs to treat one disease.

    There is a lot of truth to that.
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Kissing my woman for saliva exchanges is one of my favorite under-the-counter substitutes. ;-)
     
  5. motteatoj

    motteatoj Mezzo Forte User

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    sadly, the meds combo i am on is one arrived at after extensive trial and error.
    so, swapping is not really an option, as all have been swapped very systematically to get to the place i am at today, meaning the combo works, so it isn't going to change so easily
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Bring a glass of water up on stage with you loaded with lemons. Sucking on lemons and steady sips of water at 10 minutes intervals should get and then keep the saliva flowing.
     
  7. Dr.Mark

    Dr.Mark Mezzo Forte User

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    Hi motteatoj,
    Here's what I've recommended to several and it seems to work. The idea goes back to ancient people in the desert and maintaining a wet mouth.
    Place a small (small enough that you won't choke on it) pebble or the spice "whole clove" in your mouth. This will help activate the salivary glands and possibly keep the mouth wetter. Place the whole clove between your cheek and gum when you're playing and hopefully that will help.
    Dr.Mark
     
  8. trumpetera

    trumpetera Pianissimo User

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    Drinking water while playing doesn't work for me, at least. One needs the saliva more than water. Have you tried something called "Salagen"(at least that's what it's called where I live!)? It's a pill that stimulates saliva production-it has worked fantastically for me!
     
  9. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    You might try sucking glycerine lollipops in the intervals of playing. They are a common remedy for pre-operation patients who may not eat or drink anything before anesthesia. Ask your doctor about these.
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Wow, just saying Salagen, gets me salivating!
     

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