Church Music?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by note360, Aug 19, 2007.

  1. note360

    note360 Piano User

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    For my moms church I play every once in awhile even though I am a buddhist (Easy way for me to serve the community I stopped taking communion awhile ago though.). Any way back on topic. All the music is so easy that they give us. I might try suggesting somethign that isnt all whitespace (as I refer to music filled with whole notes and half notes). The main problem is i get it and i feel liek I picked up my first lesson book and opened up to page 3. The guy lets us add stuff into it if we want to, but really I would just like somethign abit more challenging.

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Is it a group you're playing with? If so, what kind, what skill level? Organ? Piano? Choir? What style of music does the church use? How are the acoustics? What are the demographics of the congegration? What denomination is it?

    Some of the finest and most challenging music ever written is church music; much of it is fast and loud enough to satisfy any trumpeter, but because there is so much of it, we'll need a few more details...

    By the way, a zen buddhist could make music out of the simplest piece of music. Ever try that?
     
  3. note360

    note360 Piano User

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    Yes it is a group. 3 of us are at high school level 2 of the 3 are good and the 3rd is jsut their for community service. I may end up leading the thing soon because the 4th kid went to college. In addition their is a organ player (who is decent i guess). Its a very liberal lutheran church with a female priest and decan. I guess we play pretty run of the mill stuff. The acoustics are ok. But their are definately not great. Congregation is mostly older and is furthur split in half between liberal and conservatives (big church war ftw... not really). Its just like we are literally playing really easy stuff. We usually split it out into chords, but still it is extremly easy. I think we could handle a notch higher preferably in 3 parts.
     
  4. stchasking

    stchasking Forte User

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    I am guessing you are performing for the Evangelical Lutheran Church of America. You should be wide open for ancient to modern music.

    The limitations you are experiencing probably have more to do with the church demographic than the ELCA doctrine. The old folks are always at odds with the young contemporary members. Talk the situation over with the minister, the choir director, and the worship committee chairperson. Between the three of them you should be able to figure out why the music is bland. Now, make suggestions to liven it up. You may have to buy the music yourself.

    This is my personal experience as a worship committee chairman.

    One more problem, hearing aids. Older people with hearing aids do not like contemporary head banging music in church. Lots of reverb in the sanctuary combined with 16 notes can drive the hearing aid users crazy. Music turns into noise. I left my church because of this problem.
     
  5. note360

    note360 Piano User

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    Im just looking for something more interesting than a watered down version of God Is Our Foundation or whatever we play. It is kind of boring. Im not looking to go to fast any way though. Also I think my church is at odds with ELCA and the other Lutheran Church one if I remember correctly. My church here is kind of in a war apparently. They kicked out the old pastor bc he was slightly bipolar and they tried to kick out this one who is his wife, but they failed. So weird.
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    You may want to look into doing the prelude/postlude and maybe communion or the offering solo with the organ and picking things that are challenging for you. Play the hymns then as written - the congregation is ALWAYS greatful for something to hang on to. You could also consider writing an intro or outro to the hymns - 8-32 bars.........
     
  7. Driplip

    Driplip New Friend

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    I play in the brass section at "Life" in Houston, Texas. Three weeks ago we moved into our new auditorium and opened the first service with "Cover The Earth" . The below link will take you to the listening room where you can listen to the arrangement we used. (listed in the "C" section) It should be noted that this is the website for the LIFE Music Department. While any guest my listen, you must be a member of our music department to download or access any of the written parts.

    lifetabernacle.cc - Listening Room
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2007
  8. note360

    note360 Piano User

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    Oct 16, 2006
    In a room in a house
    The intros to a few songs is good idea. I think I could do it. Thanks for the help.
     
  9. stchasking

    stchasking Forte User

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    If you would like to play descants to hymns play the tenor part up an octave. If it is too close to the alto or soprano part play it up two octaves. Instant descant and the tenors love it. Nobody ever plays their part.

    I bought my descant books from music stores that had vocal music and choir music. On the side they will have instrumental music for trumpet and other instruments. Ask your choir director where she/he shops for new music and spend a little time there. You might find some good arrangements for brass and choir.
     
  10. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Hal Leonard has The Praise & Worship Fake Book, with over 400 (less than $.10 per tune-cheap!) good, modern, interesting songs to play. As a fake book, it just has melody & chords, so you'll get to transpose and arrange stuff to suit yourself. A great learning experience to be had, and an awesome way to learn theory and arranging, which will help improv as well. Keep us posted!
     

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