Circular breathing…for those who really know

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Liad Bar-EL, Oct 22, 2006.

  1. Liad Bar-EL

    Liad Bar-EL Forte User

    1,151
    2
    Oct 25, 2003
    Jerusalem, Israel
    How do you tongue or rather attack a note while in the process of pushing the air through your mouth by using your cheek muscles?

    I can keep a note going without a break in sound while doing circular breathing.

    How can one keep tonguing a note without stop while doing circular breathing?

    I have closed the back part of my throat with the back part of my tongue but the closest I can get toward keeping the note 'attacked' continually is by using the back part of my tongue to force the air through my mouth in spurts while breathing at the same time. The attack is not clean and for those who know, am I doing it wrong? If so, what I can do to correct it?

    If you do not want to post this in public, you can send me a PM.

    Thanks for any and all replies.

    Liad
     
  2. Liad Bar-EL

    Liad Bar-EL Forte User

    1,151
    2
    Oct 25, 2003
    Jerusalem, Israel
    Just a note to give some back ground on this subject.

    I heard/saw Harry James play Flight of the Bumble Bee while using CB and I was just amazed.

    I read a post in another trumpet forum that there is one trumpet player who claims to hold the record for keeping one note going for 16 hours. He was playing it even while he was going to the bathroom. Can you imagine what this would do to your chops?!

    Rich Szabo taught me how to do circular breathing. What you do to start out is to blow a continuous stream of air through a straw in a bottle of water, allow some air to build up into your mouth, close your throat and as you push the air out of your mouth at the same time you inhale through your nose. If you have blocked nostrils, you're out of luck on this one. It takes some practice to keep the air in a smooth flow and uninterrupted when you switch from the mouth pressure to the abdominal pressure and vice versa.

    Now, for those who how to do this already, my question is while you are pushing the air out of your mouth, how can you tongue at the same time? I usually push the air out of my mouth with my cheeks and with the back of my tongue at the same time.

    As I am still working on the tonguing in CB, I am trying to isolate the air pressure with my cheeks only so as to leave the tongue free to attack the notes with the tip of my tongue and not with the back of my tongue. If anybody knows how to do this, I am asking the question: Is this the method or is it something else altogether?

    Liad Bar-EL
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2006
  3. trumpet blower88

    trumpet blower88 Mezzo Piano User

    Age:
    29
    640
    3
    Jun 15, 2005
    Flagstaff, AZ
    When ever I try to toung while doing this I try to toung just as I normaly would. It works alright but usualy sounds a litle weak just because I don't have enough air in my mouth to blow though as much as if I was using my lungs.

    If you do it correctly though, there should be no reason to have to toung while sucking in though your nose (especialy on a brass insturment). I could maybe understand on a saxaphone or something where you might have a 20+ measures of 16th note runs, but on a brass instrument you can usualy make it to the next longer note (quarter, half, ect.) where you can do it there rather than in the middle of something you have to toung.
     
  4. Victor Lopez

    Victor Lopez New Friend

    6
    0
    Oct 22, 2006
    I find that it's more difficult to tongue lightly, but if your tonguing normally, not too legato, you should be find just using your regular tongue.
     
  5. Liad Bar-EL

    Liad Bar-EL Forte User

    1,151
    2
    Oct 25, 2003
    Jerusalem, Israel
    To get this thing down to perfection I have to ask you what is your method of pushing the air through your mouth?

    The primary moving factor for me is to use the back of the tongue and it is while I am pushing this air with my tongue, that I find it difficult to attack a note (tongue it) at the same time. Maybe this method of pushing the air is not correct. Should I just be using my cheeks to push the air through my mouth?

    If you are able to tongue and breath at the same time, could you break this process down and explain it to me in detail?

    Thanks,

    Liad Bar-EL
     

Share This Page