Circular breathing

Discussion in 'Trumpet Pedagogy' started by daniel starz, May 4, 2009.

  1. daniel starz

    daniel starz Piano User

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    Jan 11, 2009
    wasilla alaska
    Cleveland
    what is the best way to breath in a circle , my school teacher told me i need to learn to play The Bumble Bee
     
  2. ChopsGone

    ChopsGone Forte User

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    Re: Besson BE709 trumpet impressions

    Sorry to butt in, but:

    How old are you?
    Why on earth does your teacher think you need to learn that piece while still in high school?

    If you're serious about trying it (I've never known a trumpet player who could resist trying FOTB), here's a generic article that explains it pretty well without going into instrumental technique much:
    Circular Breathing

    Despite the sax player's comments (never listen to sax players), it's a common practice - on oboe, especially. On trumpet, the sax player is closer to right than you would expect. FOTB doesn't demand much over 50 bars without a breath (not going to count), and circular breathing isn't an absolute requirement to play it.
     
  3. Cleve Land

    Cleve Land New Friend

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    Re: Besson BE709 trumpet impressions

    HI Daniel,

    I agree with Chops Gone. At the age of 11 that is quite a task to work on. There are songs that are good working pieces for a lifetime to keep you toned up with your embrochure and dexterity.Perhaps that is the idea of your teacher. The all around best methods are found in the Clark Studies, Arban studies and method books of this nature.
    The art of playing the trumpet is a lifetime pursuit and success is built on consistent everyday practice of technical studies, lip slurs, range builders, speed and dexterity techniques through scales studies and such. Chops Gone has given you an excellent explanation on the web link and I found a shorter summary that may be of help I will paste it below.

    Enjoy playing your trumpet but be careful of getting so bogged down with details that you loose sight of enjoying your horn. Hope this helps
    Cleveland

    "Circular breathing is a technique used in playing very particular wind instruments. For example, it is used in the playing of the didgeridoo. Sometimes circular breathing is even used in playing the oboe or flute. This is actually a very difficult technique to use, but once mastered,

    circular breathing can become almost effortless.

    Circular breathing works by first breathing in and then holding the air in your cheeks. While holding the air in the cheeks the person begins to breath through their nose. Then, as a means to learn the technique of circular breathing, the person should gradually let the air out of their mouths while continuing to breath in through their nose. Circular breathing is a little like taking a drink while trying to breath at the same time.

    One way to practice this is by using a straw and a glass of water. You are to blow air into the water through the straw while simultaneously breathing in through your nose. You want to do it fast, but evenly. Don’t blow so hard that the water goes over the sides. This exercise helps with the coordination of the breathing.

    Once having mastered that step the next step in circular breathing is to learn how to inhale. First simply continue to breath out through your mouth using your cheek muscles to expel the air. Try to breathe in through your nose. This is where circular breathing gets tricky. You must master the rhythm of exhaling through your mouth but breathing in through your nose. It’s the pumping of the air with your cheek muscles that makes the technique of circular breathing so useful in playing the wind instruments.

    Kenny G is perhaps the most famous musician who specializes in circular breathing. He set a world record using this technique, by holding a note for forty-five minutes and forty-seven seconds. "
     
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  4. daniel starz

    daniel starz Piano User

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    Jan 11, 2009
    wasilla alaska
    Re: Besson BE709 trumpet impressions

    Cleve Land and ChopsGone my teacher did not want me to play the bumblebee I wanted to learn it and ask him how to play it, he said, I need to circle breath, thank you for telling me how to do this now I have some thing to practice, sounds easy but it is really hard.
    Gleo has me working on dotted eighth notes
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2009
  5. daniel starz

    daniel starz Piano User

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    Jan 11, 2009
    wasilla alaska
    Last edited: May 5, 2009
  6. ChopsGone

    ChopsGone Forte User

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    Re: Besson BE709 trumpet impressions

    You can probably learn it with no more than some instructions and some practice. I don't remember when I finally managed to do it reliably, but I was probably no more than 13. The problem with circular breathing is that it's something you may need to know how to do, but you won't have many occasions where you really need to do it except for the occasional longer passage in which breaths are awkward to arrange. You'll find it used more often among the natural trumpet crowd than the valved players, but especially among the double reeds. Personally, I don't believe it's a particularly healthy technique, but here's one very brief how-to from an oboist:

    Jacqueline Leclair, Oboe and English Horn: Circular Breathing
     
  7. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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    There are SO many more things about playing trumpet that should occupy your time.

    On the list of trumpet things to know, it is about number 7,357.
     
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  8. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    I had it at 7,359, just ahead of not falling asleep in the pit during the boring part of the show.
    Circular breathing won't help you learning how to phrase or put down the right valve combination. Those rewards are the result of a solid fundamental study of the Arban, Clarke, and so many other studies.
    Nothing beats practice of the proper material at the proper time of development. There is no magic mouthpiece, magic horn, or magic formula to become a musician on any instrument. It takes work, and lots of it.
    A world class magician starts by learning and mastering the simple tricks first. Only then does the magician begin learning the more complex things.
    Rich Tomasek
     
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  9. ChopsGone

    ChopsGone Forte User

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    Maybe 7,358. I just remembered why I learned to do it in the first place: I'm a rotten marcher, with a heavy, jarring step. I ran into a number in which the combination of music with poor provision for breathing, rushed gasping, and jamming down my heels in the middle of a note longer than a quarter just made me sound lousy. I was able to work around the worst passages with a very little selective circular breathing. But the occasions on which I've needed to circular breathe since then could be counted on my fingers if it weren't for helping my oboist daughter master it many years ago. I'd let it wait until a real need presents itself, but don't hold your breath waiting for one of those.
     
  10. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    Hi Daniel,
    Circle breathing is pretty easy. You can puff your cheeks right? As you play a long note puff your cheeks and use the air in your cheeks(which is pushed out by squeezing your cheeks. Your tongue blocks off the air in your mouth and while you're sqeezing the air with your cheeks you're inhailing through your nose.
    So here goes:
    1)While playing a soft long tone,
    2)puff cheeks,
    3)close off air in the mouth with the tongue,
    4)sqeeze cheeks to maintain the lips buzzing and inhale at the same time. 5)Once you got your breath through the nose, go back to playing like you normally would.
    I also play digeridoo which requires circular breathing. It'll take a while to get the hang of it but once you get it, you've got it.
    If you want to see and hear someone doing the Bumble Bee, Ebay has (on DVD) a collection of Rafael Mendez videos which includes him playing the Bumble Bee while circle breathing. I own it and its totally worth every penny(approx. $18.00). You'll quickly discover that Mendez was/is scary good!!
    Good Luck and Bravo!
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2009

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