Clarifying on this range technique?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by JackTheMusician, Oct 7, 2014.

  1. JackTheMusician

    JackTheMusician Pianissimo User

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    Hello all, sorry for the 2nd post in like a couple of days but I just wanted some clarification... :huh:

    Essentially, I've seen several videos on a technique (?) to start playing higher with less pressure. It consists of playing a low C as soft as you can and gradually increasing the volume until you notice differences in volume. You then put the same amount of air through the instrument whilst keeping the same lip position and this will cause the pitch to raise. (A link provided incase I didn't explain or no one recognised it)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=icyyXVBgPR4

    I wanted to ask, realistically how can I achieve this as the busy 17 year old I am? Haha. Like, should I practise predominantly this technique? Or try practising as I do whilst trying to use this technique (Which sounds very hard, as it supposidly knocks you back to square 1), and if this effect does happen what will I do in regards to band?!

    Basically what I'm asking is how will I make this a part of my playing?
     
  2. dmennis

    dmennis New Friend

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    keep playing up chromaticly without tons of pressure and smile don't try to hard
     
  3. kingtrumpet

    kingtrumpet Utimate User

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    I have used a similar method --- usually attributed to Cat Anderson -- where you predominantly play a second line G in the scale for literally 30 minutes softly, like whisper soft ((yeah it takes a month or so to work up to that)) -- and you gradually work your way up the scale ------
    for a busy 17 year old --- I would instruct you that 10 minutes a day of long tones ((soft, long tones)) each day will help you tremendously- ---- life takes time, so does the trumpet --- be persistent, practice everyday, and in a few months or a year you will see much improvement in your playing --- record yourself also and playback ever other week or so, record yourself at that point -- compare them, you will hear a difference --- good luck my friend
     
  4. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Busy 17 year old... here is the reality. This takes time, busy or not. Check out the accompanying video of isometric exercises. This guy's got it right. He is showing you how to OPEN your airway, by developing more than just the "doughnut" muscles. He is using what I call the upper diagonals. And do you note, he does not buzz in that range, he meuows. This is how it is done. But it takes time to develop this new muscle recruitment. About 6 weeks to develop and months to improve on the process.

    I NEVER buzz at any range and use the phwooooo technique. It constantly evokes the upper diagonals and makes a real corners up smile, not the traditional corners out buzz embouchure which is tighter and less open, that cuts off the air as the range increases.
     
  5. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Oh yeah, lion breath... then how's come you haven't made it up to my range yet? My job with the EBQ is still safe KT, until you drop the asymmetric and learn how to phwoooo, my job with the quintet is safe!:lol:
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    There are multiple paths to a solid upper register and not all methods are suitable for all players. I am not sure that this method is more universal and it is very possible that even if you do everything correctly, there wil only be minor improvement. Generally, self help only has meager results as we only work out of the frame of what we understand. Young players with a primary "symphonic" sound concept have problems building extreme register due to the ears wanting "fat" and "wide".

    That all being said, a smile embouchure is actually dangerous for many if other things don't work (breathing and body use).

    As someone who has an industry job, I can't help but snicker at the term "busy 17 year old". You have no idea what busy REALLY IS! In any case, there are no short cuts. I recommend that you find a trumpet player successful in what you would like to do and get a couple of lessons. Emulation is so much more efficient than charting unknown territories.
     
  7. cfkid

    cfkid Pianissimo User

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    +1 for this statement. Plus there is a big difference between playing DHC and being able to use it. I can play it on occasion but there's no way I could ever actually play it in a piece (practice or performance). I know several really good players and I don't know any that can play a DHC in a performance.

    Mark
     
  8. JackTheMusician

    JackTheMusician Pianissimo User

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    what exactly is DHC? In assuming it's a no pressure technique ;o
     
  9. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    It's also a great airway clearing technique!:D

    I am at the NACFC in Atlanta at this very moment, and will bring this up in the pulmonary symporium, and will reference Mark as the source, cause Mark, you da man!
     
  10. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Apparently, a goal for many. The holy grail of notes. Once you get past this grail, there's just more and more above it to master.
     

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