clarke studies help

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by anthony, Jun 15, 2011.

  1. anthony

    anthony Mezzo Piano User

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    hi I am working on Clarke studies number 2 and my teacher told me and so does the book that you are supposed to play them softly and repeat them about six to seven times in one breath !! I can not play them more than two times in one breath what can I do to play them 6 times it seems impossible now to me, also I have been playing about two years .anybody? Anthony
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2011
  2. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    The idea is to continue to work them and work them until you develop better focus and air usage, and you get faster - faster to the point where you can truly play through them 6-7 times in one breath.

    Patience, and focused, dedicated practice is the only way to get that - there are no shortcuts. You simply need to put in the time. This isn't something that is going to develop in a few days or a couple of weeks. The Clarke studies are meant as daily drills to develop and maintain your technical abilities, and it could feasibly take you years to develop to the point where you can play all of them 6-7 times through in a breath. Take heart though - I've been playing trumpet nearly 30 years, and I've been playing out of the Clarke Technical studies for over 20 of that. This isn't something that you learn and then put away - you'll continue to use this as long as you play trumpet.
     
  3. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    I agree with Patrick. I used the Clark studies the same way and look at them as a necessary step toward proficiency. Your teacher is expanding on this idea by setting the goal you describe. He sounds like a creative teacher. He's definitely a keeper. So now practice and do as your teacher says!
     
  4. s.coomer

    s.coomer Forte User

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    Listen to your teacher and keep working. In time you will get there.
     
  5. kctrumpeteer

    kctrumpeteer Piano User

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    I've been recommended to get a metronome to use with the clarke studies and set a pace and play at that pace and then try to push yourself to play them faster using the metronome as a guage. By using the metronome you know for sure how fast you are playing the exercise so you can use a scientific approach to increasing your speed.

    Like everything start slow, then when you feel comfortable, speed it up, and continue doing this. You should be able to play the exercise without even looking at the exercise or thinking about the notes (If that makes sense.)
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Clarkes methodology focussed on maximum repetitions to develop skills. Patterns is the way that our brain works. Playing softly tears our chops down less quickly allowing us to practice longer and develop those patterns.

    You are in good company with one repetition currently possible. The most critical part of these exercises is not how many times you repeat, rather what PRECISION you develop. Once the pattern is solidly embedded in our fingers, magic can happen with the speed.
     
  7. anthony

    anthony Mezzo Piano User

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    Thank you everyone for your advice ,Anthony:play:
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Anthony, you are very welcome. In reviewing the list of those posting this advice, you just heard from the major league pros on this site.
     
  9. trickg

    trickg Utimate User

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    This is a really good idea. I can't tell you how often in my experience as a drummer I play with musicians with truly awful time, and they don't even know how bad it is - so bad that even when I'm laying out straight, even, basic time, they can't seem to stay with it. A lot of musicians don't like using metronomes because for those who struggle with time and tempo issues, using a metronome is tough at first. What gets me is that if a person can't play with a metronome, then how do they expect to play well in an ensemble?

    Going back to the Clarke technical studies, that's all a part of that - working with a metronome will get your brain and fingers engaged and will develop evenness and consistency throughout, no matter what key you are in.
     
  10. leftmid7

    leftmid7 Mezzo Piano User

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    I think another key with C#2 is consistent air flow while fingering. A lot of beginning students are so focussed on playing it fast and/or doing as many repetitions as possible they don't start with playing it well in the first place. You get this 'huuu-hu-hu huuu-hu-hu huuu-hu-hu' thing happening instead one long flowing passage.

    Practice softly, slowly and with a solid air column that doesn't ebb. You'll get there.
     

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