Clarke Study #1 (further explanation)

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by mallik503, May 21, 2015.

  1. mallik503

    mallik503 New Friend

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    May 20, 2015
    Hey all,
    After reading the some of the forums on the study and the instructions for the study itself i have a question that hopefully someone can answer. I have been doing the clarke study #1 each day right after my warm up routine. I play as close to pp as possible where barely a tone is being produced. I have been starting on the notes g A B or C depending on the day and i determine which one to do the exercise on based on if the top not of the chromatic passages speaks or note. I usually feel a burn in the corners and i usually take a breath after around 2 or 3 reps. After some research i noticed it said to each one of the exercises 8 to 16 times. Does that mean do the pattern on every note 8 to 16 times and that be all for the day? Also what would be the best way to implement this study into my practice? PLEASE BE SPECIFIC AS POSSIBLE!!!
     
  2. fels

    fels Piano User

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    Jun 8, 2008
    Colorado Springs
    not sure but am very interested in the "collective" responses.
     
  3. trumpetdiva1

    trumpetdiva1 Piano User

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    Jun 6, 2004
    Albuquerque
    Play each exercise from the first study three times in one breath.

    1x=Slur
    2x=Single Tongue
    3x=Double Tongue

    The exercise can be practiced in the following order:

    7
    8
    6
    9
    10
    5
    11
    4
    12
    3
    13
    2
    14
    1

    I practiced the first half of the book one day and the other half of the book the next day.

    Best wishes,

    Janell Carter
     
  4. mallik503

    mallik503 New Friend

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    May 20, 2015
    Thank you so much
     
  5. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    I like to roll one of my "Music Dice" to randomly choose a key for the session and then I do all the Clarke exercises in that key..
     
  6. Carroll W. Schroeder

    Carroll W. Schroeder Pianissimo User

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    Nov 3, 2009
    McMinnville, Oregon
    My Teacher after many years of being absent from the trumpet started me out on the Clark TS and insted of 8-16 repetitions in one breath he wanted 16-32 , well you may of guessed I was flabergasted to say the least. I never made it to 16 but I did make it to 10 and thats not to bad for a man pushing 70... But the main Idea is to learn to push yourself and control your air with good articulation, and I agree with Trumpet divas way alternating the lesson numbers, it will give you better lip flexability and keep you from being to repetitious. Good luck the Clark Tech studies are some of the best there are for beginners and pros alike.
    I thought I should add this after my first posting: My teacher taught me to do the Clark TS first study PP the first measure 3 times in a row then the full bar 2 times in a row and then push your self on any one lesson in the first study, it does keep you from being board and it will make the lesson work better for you. this is why teachers are so important they can take an exercise and use it to get the student to do better than the student can do all by him or her self.
     
  7. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    The one way to get eight to sixteen repetitions is to play them real fast and real softly.
     
  8. mallik503

    mallik503 New Friend

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    May 20, 2015
    Thanks guys. This was all very helpful i have started using all of your advice. Now if only someone had a video of a professional doing. I would be set! :)
     
  9. mallik503

    mallik503 New Friend

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    May 20, 2015
    also i am doing them at 60-70 bpm because it says go slow first. Is this Ok?
     
  10. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Going slow is the way to start. Then test your limits from time to time.
     

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