Claude Gordon Daily Trumpet Routines

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Alex_C, Oct 2, 2010.

  1. Alex_C

    Alex_C Piano User

    449
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    May 30, 2010
    Gilroy, California
    Anyone working through this book? It looks like essentially a year's course.

    I'd like to get ahold of his Systematic Approach to Daily Practice, too.

    What do the people here think of this book?
     
  2. Dark Knight

    Dark Knight Pianissimo User

    187
    3
    Apr 7, 2010
    Canada
    Alex C,

    I have collected as much CG material as I can get my hands on. The Systematic Approach is fairly high level. Each lesson starts you off with CG concepts and exercises. He then finishes the lesson with prescribed exercises from at least one of the follow books and sometimes more: Clarks Technical Studies, Walter Smith's Lip Flexibility Studies, Charles Colin Lip Flexibility Studies, St. Jacome's Grand Method, and Arban's Celebrated Method. His book has you going from double pedals to many ledger lines above the stave almost immediately; all very intimidating. However, I would still buy the book for his writings at the very beginning; most enlightening.

    I am really into CG and within the first year of a comeback. I absolutely love his "Physical Approach to Elementary Brass Playing for Trumpet". The exercises are really "doable". He gives you a chance to work into the pedals and higher stave material over a course of many lessons. It is very systematic and progressive. From here, there is another of his books I recently obtained: "Daily Trumpet Routines". Judging the best I can, it would seem that this book is the next step as it would seem "doable" after his "Physical Approach" book. Daily Trumpet Routines does appear to be within my distant reach.

    Two alternatives. Eric Bovin who is a former CG student has written a systematic approach to Arban's Method with prescribed exercises. He really teaches you how to use Arban's Mehod to cover all the things you are supposed to cover in a single lesson, and there are 69 lessons that take you cover-to-cover through Arban's Method. The second alternative is Rubank's Advanced Method I and II. Each book contains 36 lessons and each lesson consists of: (1) scales and arpeggios; (2) melodic interpretation; (3) articulation; (4) flexibility and tonguing; (5) ornaments; and (6) solo work. Of course, each lesson is a progressive advance from the previous unit. It is a very easy to use compact guide to practice.

    Hope this helps.

    Best Wishes,

    DK
     
  3. bhstrumpet18

    bhstrumpet18 New Friend

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    0
    Oct 2, 2010
    Bakersfield, CA

    My father took lessons from Claude for many years, I happen to have hand written lessons from Claude, maybe about 100 pages of them, with all of his books, a CG Benge trumpet, and a CG personal mouthpiece, if you have any specific questions, I'm sure I could help. I have been playing with claude's method for 12 years now, and I am 18
     
  4. Dark Knight

    Dark Knight Pianissimo User

    187
    3
    Apr 7, 2010
    Canada
    Thank you very much. I will say this much. I never heard of pedals before this year. It has taken me several months learn how to get to pedal Db but pedal C still eludes me. I purachsed one of Eric Bovins lessons and played along until I could get it right. One very interesting thing. I "think" pedals may be teaching me more how to use my air properly. I usually warm down with them after about 45 minutes of playing. Once, just for fun, I went to slur the chromatic scale as high a I could just see what I had left. I started at middle and with zero effort made to high C. I seem to get that effortless high C "only" after warming down with pedals. It is the weirdest thing I have thus far enountered in my comeback.

    Best Wishes,

    DK
     
  5. bhstrumpet18

    bhstrumpet18 New Friend

    28
    0
    Oct 2, 2010
    Bakersfield, CA
    Your very right actually. Air control is key for me, Expecially for such a large bore trumpet, my trumpet has a .468 bore, HUGE, and it requires a huge amount of air to play high, to top that off, my CG Personal mouthpiece is one of the deepest cups you can possibly get. after the years of practice I have endured, no one I have ever heard, even in all the allstate bands I have been in have come close to that sort of sound, when you are in a hall, it just opens up, and effortlessly play over entire jazz bands, although I prefer not playing lead, I enjoy 2nd. very interesting and I think you should try a big bore, it will prepare you even more.
     
  6. Alex_C

    Alex_C Piano User

    449
    6
    May 30, 2010
    Gilroy, California
    Wow this is so cool.

    OK so "A Systematic Approach..." may be a bit advanced for me, but if I can find "A Physical Approach" and the one about "As Easy As Breathing" I'll get those.

    There's an excellent music store up in Mountain View I like to go to when I'm up there, and I may be, next weekend. And there's a shop about 7 miles away I can bicycle to, that can order most anything. Then I can always get a friend to get stuff for me on Amazon and just pay him.

    I'm not going to try a big bore I AM a big .... wait, let me say this different ... I'm a beginner and I like my little cornet.
     

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