Claude Gordon Pedal Tones

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Satchmo Brecker, Feb 26, 2013.

  1. Satchmo Brecker

    Satchmo Brecker Piano User

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    I read through the first chapter in Claude Gordons Systematic Approach to Practice. In the section on Pedal Tones he explains about low F# and going flat. He then shows a little staff with the notes going below F# WITH FINGERINGS, like 1 for low F, 12 for E, etc. Ok, then near the end he says this: Do Not Deviate from the fingerings I have marked. (I'm assuming these are the 1 low F, 12 low E, etc.). Then this sentence, which seems to contradict the one before it: All the lower octaves use the same fingering: G with 1 and 3, F# with all three.

    So which is it when you do pedal tones? Do you stick with his fingerings, 1,12,etc. or do you stick with his fingerings 13 / G, 123 F# and lip things down?
     
  2. Juarez-MA

    Juarez-MA Pianissimo User

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    I am not entirely sure myself since I have not looked at the Claude Gordon yet (although it is on my list of material to review!).
    It sounds like you would use 123 for the low F# and then continue down from F as if you were playing F in first space.
    Does this make sense?
     
  3. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Juarez-MA, absolutely correct. Starting on f below the staff, things are lipped down (they ain't on the horn) until Pedal C. The fingerings used are those from f in the staff. Pedal C is the fundamental tone, and normal fingerings work until F#. Below that, everything is lipped, but using "normal" fingerings is the norm.
     
  4. stumac

    stumac Fortissimo User

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    It has been a concern of mine that a lot of teachers include the notes between low F# and pedal C in their methods, these notes do not exist as part of the harmonic series and belong with the premis that a trumpet amplifies the buzzing of the players lips. It is hard enough to play the notes that the instrument responds to without having to generate ones that it does not.

    Regards, Stuart.
     
  5. ultratrumpet

    ultratrumpet Piano User

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    This is the Claude Gordon way...

    The notes from F below low C on down through D flat are not on the horn. You have to make them. Since these notes have the feel of bending notes flat, the correct way to develop the right feel is to bend tones flat. Play low C and slur down to B natural, second valve. This establishes the pitch. Now play the same two notes without using any valves for B. (bend C flat a half step.) Now continue down with the same idea, first using valves to establish the pitch. then bending notes flat, using no valves. When you get down to low G (0), you will have played it as though it were a pedal tone. Now start on low B natural, and continue down through low F sharp in the same manner. When you play low F sharp second valve, you will be playing it as though it were a pedal tone. Now start on B flat next, and continue down to pedal F. You will notice that the last two notes (B flat to F) are different in that there are no valve changes.To establish the pitch, we play an octave above first. You will also notice that pedal F is nothing more than a B flat bent a perfect fourth, pedal E is a low A bent four note flats, and so on. Play the octave above first to determine the pitch, then bend the notes into the pedals.
    Pedal C on down have a totally different feel, these notes being the fundamentals of the series of overtones, are on the horn. Your first pedal C will generally "pop out," but it will be extremely flat - as much as 4 or 5 notes. Do not be concerned, for this is the correct feel and approach. To try and play this note in tune at first would be the wrong approach, let it hang flat for a long time, weeks and even months, working for a big sound and vibration. it will automatically work itself up into pitch as you develop.
    The third pedal register, pedal F below pedal C on down are easy.They are in tune, and it's just a matter of time and practice in developing the big vibration necessary to play them. While I can play down to third pedal C, for the purpose of development it is not necessary to go any lower than second pedal C ( two octaves below low C), because nothing further develops from this point down.

    Acknowledgment:
    Bill Knevitt
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013
  6. misty.sj

    misty.sj Forte User

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    Jeanne Pocius says to skip em and go to the double pedals.
     
  7. sounds7

    sounds7 Forte User

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    Anyone else have trouble making the low C? especially with the marked fingering?
     
  8. Juarez-MA

    Juarez-MA Pianissimo User

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    That's what I usually end up doing.
     
  9. Juarez-MA

    Juarez-MA Pianissimo User

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    Yes. Claude Gordon is only one school of pedal tones.
    I haven't done any formal study on pedal tones, but I do know I have good luck playing pedal C when I finger it like a B natural.
     
  10. ultratrumpet

    ultratrumpet Piano User

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    cheers
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2013

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