Cleaning a Rotary Trumpet

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by jwmrks, Sep 26, 2015.

  1. Franklin D

    Franklin D Forte User

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    Why do you feel so guilty?
     
  2. Sethoflagos

    Sethoflagos Utimate User

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    You are aware that he's started a red chicklet war, Elmar?

    I shalln't respond in kind of course. But my original comment stands on general principals.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Ummm,
    let's please get back to cleaning the horn so that jwmrks gets his moneys worth. I think he gets the gist of TrumpetMaster dynamics by now!
     
  4. jwmrks

    jwmrks New Friend

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    No harm here on my part, and sorry if I came off as being harsh to you. Text messages are always the easiest to misinterpret their tone as you have no voice inflection, facial expression or body language to help you judge.

    Personally I have no issue at all with this advice as the bases were covered (though not specifically stated). If you don't know what you are doing, you could really do damage so a tech is the way to go, but if you're up to it, here are some instructions. It was more the second post where the advice was pretty much 'Oh, it's a Russian TSO. That's junk, you need to get a better instrument' that doesn't really fit me that I was ignoring. That advice might not be off base for a student looking for a horn they will be performing with, but for someone looking for a cheap horn as a curiosity it doesn't fit. Kind of like looking for advice on fixing your beat-up pickup and being told you need to get a new Jaguar convertible. True the new Jag would be nicer, but if your primary need is hauling equipment it's really not the best option.
     
  5. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Are you sure it's not a narrow-bore rotary flugel? Some pics might help.
     
  6. kehaulani

    kehaulani Fortissimo User

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    Hawaian homey
    I want to know more about Russian hooters.
     
  7. jwmrks

    jwmrks New Friend

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    I'm not too familiar with the rotary family so it very well could be:

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  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    It is a trumpet. The mouthpipe looks a bit long for modern intonation. The taper of the mouthpipe is probably not conventional MORSE taper. That was an issue in the US years ago too. The valve cluster has the "Heckel" geometry -the first valve slides point toward the mouthpiece.

    The corks on the valves should be replaced. They are for sure no longer aligned. If you unscrew the bottom valve caps, you will see the alignment marks. I use silicone rubber instead of cork for these stoppers. When you play a c above the staff, you can depress the water key for even more security.

    As far as recommendations go, once everything is cleaned and aligned, test the tuning again with a tuner. Cutting down the mouthpipe will not get you a half tone higher - perhaps 30 - 40 cents max. It is possible that once the alignment of the valves is OK that the basic intonation will have improved some. After the mouthpipe, another 50 cents could be picked up by shortening both legs of the tuning slide.

    It looks like a very well built instrument. If it plays OK, it is for sure worth investing a little bit.
     
  9. barliman2001

    barliman2001 Fortissimo User

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    Definitely a trumpet. The original leadpipe hs at some point been replaced with something that looks suspiciously like a leadpipe from a piston-valve flugelhorn andwhich definitely never was an original part of the horn (the two knobs on the leadpipe point the flugel way, and their style does not fit with what is a fairly consistent horn).
    Originally built or at least adapted for a military establishment in Leningrad (the name of the town is legible on the bell),in the year 1966 (legible on the bell as well). As Russian military orchestras usually were pitched at A= 430hz (some of them have moved up, but many still use the old low pitch - even modern creations like the Russian Wind Orchestra in Vienna https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fsx0bdgEFmw and RBO: Russisches Blasorchester), so this may account for the new leadpipe and the low pitch (and the taper problems!!)
     
  10. BrassBandMajor

    BrassBandMajor Fortissimo User

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    Russians did make attractive looking top action rotary valve cornets.
     

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