cleaning the trumpet?!?!?!

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by MadScout08, Feb 21, 2006.

  1. MadScout08

    MadScout08 New Friend

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    Feb 21, 2006
    so guys, i am new here, so i will give you a little background... i am a senior in high school and i am going to college to study the trumpet. long story short, i love to play. i was just wondering what some of you guys on here did specifically for that once-a-month deep clean. thanks a lot!!!
    Sincerely,
    Chris Jackson
    MYNWA
     
  2. KMT

    KMT Pianissimo User

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  3. Solar Bell

    Solar Bell Moderator Staff Member

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  4. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    Chris,

    For the novice, here is a good description of what to do:
    http://www.musichem.com/articles/pst_care.htm

    Personally, I gave up on soaking and such when I bought a steam cleaner.
    It removes more gunk than any other method I know of and leaves absolutely no residue since you are cleaning with steam.

    Greg
     
  5. The_Lip

    The_Lip Pianissimo User

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    Greg,

    You need to fix the link. There's an extra period at the end that makes it not work.
     
  6. Clarence

    Clarence Mezzo Forte User

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    gzent, over time do you think steaming your horn will damage your joint,s?
    i mean that,s gotta be some heat your putting thru the horn.
    just wondering.
     
  7. MadScout08

    MadScout08 New Friend

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    Feb 21, 2006
    thanks for all the help guys.. i dont know if i am too keen about steam cleaning my horn, but otherwise thanks... alot... i wont complain about any more input though... what does everyone think about chemical baths???
    Chris
     
  8. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

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    Clarence,

    The model I use is the Euro-Pro Ultra Steam Shark II that you can buy at Sears. This is at the low end of the cost scale, so its low pressure and low temperature compared to the more expensive models.

    These cheaper models don't exceed about 240 degrees F coming out of the boiler. By the time the steam goes through the hose, out the spout and hits the metal I'm sure it has cooled down quite a bit closer to 220 or less.

    The "soft" solder used in making the slides and softer sections of brass instruments is something like 60/40 tin/lead ratio which melts around 360 degrees or so. There's no way the steam can melt that solder.
    It requires a butane torch to melt.

    The silver solder used in construction of the valve section and pistons melts at much, much higher temps, something like 1200 deg F and requires a propane torch.

    So, I'm not worried about damaging the metal with steam. So far, I haven't seen it get hot enough to soften lacquer either.

    Now, considering the corrosive chemical cleaners that are used by some shops I think the steam cleaning is the way to go. Plus, it leaves no residue like chemicals that can keep eating away if not neutralized.

    Also, consider that if that sort of heat were a problem then the solder joints would be ruined on trumpets that have "baked" finishes.

    Just my 2c,

    Greg

    PS - I'd love to hear Leigh's (of Eclipse Trumpets) views on the subject.
     
  9. Eclipsehornplayer

    Eclipsehornplayer Forte User

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    I'm with you Clarence.... I saw this post and went.... :shock:

    I can't imagine steam cleaning my horns.... I clean them weekly using the snakes and what not you run through them. Polish them, etc...

    That's it.... Works for me...
     
  10. MadScout08

    MadScout08 New Friend

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    Feb 21, 2006
    What exactly do you do when you run the snakes through them... do you do this dry??? also, is this all you do, or do you do a "deep clean" every now and then???
    Chris
     

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