Colin Advanced Lip Flexibilities

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by nestbeast, Apr 10, 2010.

  1. nestbeast

    nestbeast Pianissimo User

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    Cultural black hole
    This seems like a great book but how do you use it? There are so many chapters and so many exercises. I would like to know the most effective way to use this book as it contains no instructions.
    Thank you.
     
  2. reedy

    reedy Piano User

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    Wiltshire, UK
    start at the beginning! dont rush through it though, spend a few weeks on the 1st few ones then move on after a few weeks
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The Colin book is best used with an experienced teacher. There is too much non-DYI stuff in there.
     
  4. nestbeast

    nestbeast Pianissimo User

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    Thank you this information is most helpful. Its nice to be in touch with fellow trumpet players.
     
  5. s.coomer

    s.coomer Forte User

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    As is true with most books, you really need a teacher to guide you through it.
     
  6. rbdeli

    rbdeli Mezzo Piano User

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    Here's how I wouldn't use it.

    Don't spend too much time with it. Go over a few of the exercises a few minutes a day. Don't force it. Don't sweat it and don't consider it true practice.

    Technique practice will make you a great technician, but not a great trumpet player. I learned this the hard way. I could do amazing things with my single tonguing, fingering and Irons, Colin Lip flexibilities routines, but when it came time to audition, I never played as well as I could of had I spent more time practicing one other thing: MUSIC.
     
  7. rbdeli

    rbdeli Mezzo Piano User

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    What do you mean by "non Do It Yourself Stuff"?

    Teachers are players too. Teachers are still learning and many of us are still taking lessons from other teachers while we are teaching. At what point are we no longer a non do-it-yourselfer? Do you wake up one day and say, "Okay, now I'm ready to do it myself?". :)


     
  8. nestbeast

    nestbeast Pianissimo User

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    Jul 31, 2008
    Cultural black hole
    Thank you for this good advice. I once studied with a guy at a university who could play all the John Haynie stuff but he couldn't play a recital - his nerves ate him up. He always had a very "shrill" sound because he played with so much tension.
    Peace and many great opportunities to perform and bring enjoyment to the lives of others.
     
  9. rbdeli

    rbdeli Mezzo Piano User

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    nestbeast,

    That guy sounds just like me.I spent 3 hours a day practicing technique and another 45 minutes practicing my reading; then if there was some time music. I was scared to death to play a recital, yet one of the college private instructors once described me as having the fastest #$(*ing single tongue he ever heard. Some good that did me.

    Don't get me wrong, technique is very important, but if I had to do it all over again: I would spend more time with songs that utilize the technical skills and less time with the mundane exercise routines that do nothing for our musicality.
     
  10. hup_d_dup

    hup_d_dup Piano User

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    Tewksbury, NJ, USA
    I agree with this. That said, notice that the text is divided into three volumes, and the first exercises in each of the three volumes are very similar, if not identical. That should give you a sense of how this material can be systematically approached.
     

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