College Question

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by a marching trumpet, May 2, 2010.

  1. a marching trumpet

    a marching trumpet Mezzo Piano User

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    1
    Feb 11, 2009
    Murfreesboro, TN
    So chances are I will be going to MTSU, which is like 15 min away from me, and they have a really good music program, so I hear about the classes I have to take and everything, but from those of you who have been through music programs I've heard its best to learn all instruments that people play up through high school at a grade 4 level, due to you never know what type of band you may get for your 1st job, so, whats it like to be a music major? Are the classes terribly hard? I am gonna go through it definately, but what in general are the hardest classes, and what can I do, since im finishing up my junior year, to prepare myself for the courses i'll take in college?:oops:
     
  2. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

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    1,154
    Aug 15, 2009
    Alabama
    Keep in mind your first hurtle will be to get through the general studies courses of your feshman and sophmore year. That is English, history, Sciences etc. This is not meant to be critical -however, the long run-on sentence from your post hints that general studies classes may be more difficult for you than your music classes.

    Keep in mind there will be performing classes, theory classes, music history classes etc. It sounds like you have a love of music so hopefully music related courses will be your easiest. Where most students run into difficulty isn't with their major subjects (which they tend to enjoy or they wouldn't be in that field) but with other courses that are required but they find not highly in line with their goals. Best of luck. Just take it one class at at time.
     
  3. Markie

    Markie Forte User

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    15
    Jan 4, 2009
    Clarksburg, WV
    Whether you become a banker, baker or candlestick maker, you have to complete your general studies.
    I've seen tons of students who thought they were ready to graduate only to find out they need a general requirement class (ex: history or english literature) which they should have taken their freshman or sophmore year. Get your general requirements(GR) out of the way. Usually the GR for BA is different than it is for a BS. Know your student handbook and when classes are offered.
    Get with people and create a cohort you can study with and understand that there will be times that a chapter will be too hard.
    What to do? Just stick in there and DO NOT quit. People will tell you that you have to be smart to gradute college. Let me suggest that a "stick to it" attitude is MORE important than being ubersmart. Don't let anything shake your resolve to graduate. I've seen people graduate that had cancer, go through a divorce, watch a parent die, etc. and pass with flying colors. I've seen a bucketload of students quit because they got a failing grade on a test and their ego couldn't handle it or they got in the habit of partying and skipping classes.
    Question:
    What do you call the person with the lowest GPA in a graduating class of doctoral students?
    Answer:
    Doctor
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2010
  4. samdaman

    samdaman Pianissimo User

    129
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    Jun 15, 2006
    Baltimore, MD
    If you're not proficient at piano---> *Take piano lessons prior to starting college!*

    Get your trumpet chops up and start learning literature that you can play. Also start a library of quality recordings. As your going through college, soak up as much as you can from whomever you can. Also, HAVE FUN! If you're not enjoying music, music making and your chice of majors, then you might want to switch it up.
     
  5. s.coomer

    s.coomer Forte User

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    Mar 25, 2005
    Indianapolis, In
    Steve Ricks has given you the best answer possible. I would only add that it is much easier to space your general studies classes throughout the four years. You do not necessarily have to take English, Science, history, etc. all in your freshman and sophomore year. If you spread them out it will become much more manageable.
     
  6. mchs3d

    mchs3d Mezzo Forte User

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    262
    Sep 30, 2005
    Provo, UT
    Being a music major can be hard, but the best thing to do is to remember your goals. Also, you will have to sacrifice some partying and fun times in order to get work done. It is just how life is. However, if you really have a love for music, you will find it out for yourself quickly. College seems to be a good garden tool for weeding out those have "what it takes" and those who don't.
     
  7. Pedal C

    Pedal C Mezzo Forte User

    989
    2
    Jan 24, 2005
    Playing piano is helpful. I never played before college and took piano class there for two years. However...I was a performance major and didn't have to take a piano proficiency test...education majors did, and many, many struggled with it. So, check out the requirements for your school and take some piano lessons if you can. The proficiency stuff isn't amazingly hard, but it takes time and effort to learn.

    As for other instruments, if you're a music education major, you'll probably have to take brass, string and woodwind methods classes where you'll play each instrument a bit and (more importantly) learn how to start beginners and learn something about teaching the basics of these other instruments. How well you play them isn't really all that important. I wouldn't advise spending any time on that stuff ahead of time. Work hard at the trumpet and deal with method classes with the time comes. I don't know anyone who was ever bounced from a music degree program because they couldn't play other instruments well, but I HAVE seen people bounced because they failed the piano proficiency test time after time.
     
  8. crazyandy88

    crazyandy88 Pianissimo User

    191
    2
    Nov 3, 2007
    Fayetteville, AR
    I am taking my last final next week and I will have my music degree. I would agree that it is easier to spread your general core classes out over the extent of your time at college. That way you don't have 6 papers, 4 presentations, and a jury to worry about the last week of school. Also, try to take a few general courses in the summer since you live so close. I wish I had done this as it would have saved me some stress during the semester. The two biggest helpers for me have been 1. A strict daily schedule that includes class times, practice times, breaks, meals, and free time. 2. A daily practice routine. Start this now! It will be a great asset if you already have a great practice ethic. You will have more time to practice in college than you will any time after. If you don't already have them, go buy and practice the Arban and Clark books as these are standard texts for trumpet study. ALWAYS make music...faster, higher, and louder come after that. Hope this helps. It's been the time of my life and I'm sure it will be for you too.
     
  9. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

    3,444
    1,154
    Aug 15, 2009
    Alabama
    Lots of good advice here. Piano is certainly a good recommendation. And, yes, when possible, spread your general studies over the 4 years. To me, the general studies were far more difficult than the higher level courses. Too many of the profs used the general study courses to "weed out" the population. Many of the profs would even tell you so up front. Once you made it to the 300 and 400 level courses, the courses seemed much easier. I graduated with my BS in 76 so maybe it has changed some -however, I work daily with 11 universities and what I see indicates it hasn't.
     
  10. SteveRicks

    SteveRicks Fortissimo User

    3,444
    1,154
    Aug 15, 2009
    Alabama
    Lots of good advice here. Piano is certainly a good recommendation. And, yes, when possible, spread your general studies over the 4 years. To me, the general studies were far more difficult than the higher level courses. Too many of the profs used the general study courses to "weed out" the population. Many of the profs would even tell you so up front. Once you made it to the 300 and 400 level courses, the courses seemed much easier. I graduated with my BS in 76 so maybe it has changed some -however, I work daily with 11 universities and what I see indicates it hasn't.
     

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