come back player problems

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Paul Raffeld, Dec 6, 2007.

  1. Paul Raffeld

    Paul Raffeld New Friend

    5
    0
    Mar 21, 2006
    Austin Texas
    Tom,
    I used to play in high school and college. Then I worked out of the field of music for 27 years. Now I am retired and trying to play again. On top of the usual problems in a case like this, I have a bridge on the top front teeth. This has resulted in a different mouth piece position, but one I belive for the better. Now for the rather strange question. I can get a nice sound and play comfortably up to about B flat or C, but only if I put a lot of air in the horn. The sound is strong and perhaps "loud", but I am am not working hard for this sound. However, when I try to play soft, I seem to close my throat and the sound turns weak and unstable. How does a trumpet player play soft? I think that you need to keep the support from below and you need enough air to make the lips vibrate and not go flat. When I am playing soft I even hear a grunting sound that is simply not there when I let it rip. I could really use some advice.

    Thanks
    Paul Raffeld
     
  2. thomashooten

    thomashooten Pianissimo User

    90
    1
    Feb 21, 2005
    Atlanta
    Hello,

    I would really suggest getting some advice from a private teacher.
    These things are hard to address in this forum withour hearing you. Find a teacher in your area that will help you create a healthy, balanced approach to getting back into playing.

    Tom
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
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    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    Paul,
    your breathing is the problem and a good teacher is the best medicine.
    You can try this though:
    picture the breathing cycle as a circle. Inhale is the left and exhale is the right side. You will notice that the top and bottom are also round. Your description shows that you have an angle-an abrupt change from inhale to exhale. Practice breathing WITHOUT the horn. Stand up, feet parallel and about shoulder distance apart. Inhale slowly and deeply and when you are full, exhale being careful not to put any bump in the process. The same thing applies when transitioning from exhale to inhale - do not add "tension" to get more air in more quickly. When you have "successfully" completed a couple of cycles - replace exhale with play (do not use the tongue to get your sound started, just "exhale" through the horn). You will immediately notice the strain at the top and bottom of the circle and that is where you will have to start working. This is what happens when our playing is not properly monitored. Things creep into the process and we have no idea how they got there. There is of course MUCH, MUCH more to pay attention to, trying to succeed with a DIY approach just is not a very efficient way.

    Draw a big circle on a piece of paper and hang it up in the room that you practice in. If someone asks you what it is, tell them "breathing art"!
     
  4. tatakata

    tatakata Mezzo Forte User

    957
    5
    May 29, 2007
    I agree that this gentleman needs a teacher. But who knows if breathing is really the problem. People throw out breathing like its a cure all. This man sites specific problems with his "set up". He has a bridge on his teeth and a different mouthpiece position. Would breathing exercises help. Sure. But maybe not.

     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

    Age:
    61
    16,612
    7,955
    Jun 18, 2006
    Germany
    tatakata,
    breathing ALWAYS helps!
    Players that ask questions like this threads owner ALWAYS have breathing issues. That may not be the only problem, but getting started here is free and useful as it gives the next teacher a better basis to start.
     

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