Comeback-ers & Etudes

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Comeback, Apr 1, 2012.

  1. Richard Oliver

    Richard Oliver Forte User

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    Jul 18, 2006
    Casper, WY
    Good luck, Jim. I look forward to hearing you play, again :).

    Some of what I've found is that for us hobbyists, even more than the playing itself, there's a thrill that comes from finding the gumption to record ourselves. With practice, no great agony awaits for the person who clicks the play button. The excitement that comes from such a little project has, in the past, served well to inspire me to either get lessons, keep practicing as much as time will allow, and play in groups that are nearby, and from them cull some players who want to tackle some quintets.

    Some years ago, I had a real hoot out of recording a few of my favorite hymns. It was fun to lay down all 4 parts, and to realize, "shoot, that ain't half-bad!"

    From what I've seen from noodling online on the trumpet sites for several years is the comeback crowd is generally quite supportive of each other in our attempts to become better musicians. The pros I've gotten to know have been, by in large, gracious in their friendliness, spare but apt in the criticism, & generally nice guys.

    So Jim, record away. Find stuff you like, and do your dead level best to play it in such a way that other people have a decent chance of liking it too. So years ago, several of us PM'd clips/vids back and forth to each other. That was a fun thing to do. And when I had an iMac, one online buddy and I played some Arban's duets with each other. That was a gas.
     
  2. mrsemman

    mrsemman Piano User

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    Apr 8, 2010
    Massachusetts
    After a massive blow-up at a funeral gig in January, I decided to really get serious with my playing. I decided to video tape my practice sessions and made the humbling discovery that what my ear heard and what actually came out of the bell, were two different things. Video taping or recording practices gives you the type of feedback that you need. Listen to how others play. I use "play-a-long" music to listen and then imitate as best I could. I was disappointed with my trumpet teacher for not actually pointing my problems out to me. Most probably because I outrank him by twenty years, and he feared me having a heart attack in his basement. So recently, he gave me the Cichowicz Flow Studies, which made all the difference in the world for me. More air, more articulation, meant more enjoyable music in my feed back recordings. More enjoyment allowed me to spend more time understanding the music and to work on improvisation. I have attached a video from around the February time frame. Hope it comes out.http://s815.photobucket.com/albums/zz75/mrsemman/?action=view&current=20120203092110.mp4#!oZZ2QQcurrentZZhttp%3A %2F%2Fs815.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fzz75%2Fmrsem man%2F%3Faction%3Dview%26current%3D20120210093949. mp4
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Re: Preparation & Boldness

    Hi Jim,
    thank you for your consideration. Do not regard my comment as a method to "put off" exposure until some undefined time in the future. We all know what we are capable of. THAT is what we want to capture, a true picture of a current serious attempt. Artistry is not the goal, rather a look at where you are and what could come next. Things like basic intonation and solid rhythm should be well covered. Most of the "help" that we can offer will be with things like breathing and articulation. The closer you are to your limit, the better our advice can be. The further away it is from your capabilities, the more "insulting" advice pops up.
     
  4. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

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    Jun 22, 2011
    Fort Wayne, IN
    Icebreaker

    mrseman wrote:
    "I decided to video tape my practice sessions and made the humbling discovery that what my ear heard and what actually came out of the bell, were two different things. Video taping or recording practices gives you the type of feedback that you need...More air, more articulation, meant more enjoyable music in my feed back recordings. More enjoyment allowed me to spend more time understanding the music and to work on improvisation. I have attached a video from around the February time frame."

    mrseman,
    Thank you for breaking the ice! While your post wasn't exactly an etude, it was useful all the same. You are already working on what I think I noticed: more air, more articulation. Whenever my attacks falter or my tone becomes a little airy, it is almost invariably a matter of breath support. I am anxious to read what more knowledgeable and experienced posters may write. I will be posting on this thread for the first time in a few days. I'm still not happy with my etude.

    rowuk wrote:
    "We all know what we are capable of. THAT is what we want to capture, a true picture of a current serious attempt. Artistry is not the goal, rather a look at where you are and what could come next. Things like basic intonation and solid rhythm should be well covered."

    rowuk,
    Thank you for your continuing interest in this comebacker adventure. I pretty much agree with all that you wrote, but I wonder if artistry should still be in the mix at some level of priority. If producing music on our trumpets is our ultimate goal, might it be helpful to be building that aesthetic along with technique?

    Jim
     
  5. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Re: Icebreaker

    Jim,
    without having heard you, I really don't know how to answer the question.

    For players with solid building blocks (intonation, tone, rhythm) of course expression becomes an issue. I have trouble with artistic license before a foundation is laid however.

    It is kind of like an Indy car driver that turns really fast laps, but crashes a lot. Trumpeters can be like that too.

    Amazingly enough, most players develop a feel for the music linearly with the quality of their tone - unfortunately very often with a bad sense of rhythm. Ever hear the trumpet section be accused of dragging or rushing? That is normally a sign of a missing inner pulse. A missing "feel" for dotted notes. Being more on transmit rather than receive.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2012
  6. Comeback

    Comeback Forte User

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    Jun 22, 2011
    Fort Wayne, IN
    Robin Adair

    Patience required! I'm not sure that MySpaceFileHosting is the best choice for this sort of thing. However, with a little patience the link appears. The trumpet and mouthpiece are as described in my original post. I am nine months into my comeback. This effort is probably reasonably representative of my present skill level. The arrangement is from Arban's page 191, in my maroon colored cover edition. On rowuk's advice, which I appreciate, gruppettos were deleted. Your constructive criticism, or even good-natured ribbing, is welcome.
    Jim

    HTML:
    http://MySpaceFileHosting.com/lnesi/Robin_Adair_7.wma.html
     
  7. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    Worth repeating. I keep a digital recorder in my gig bag, and use it often when practicing or at gigs.

    Mike
     
  8. jiarby

    jiarby Fortissimo User

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    May 7, 2011
    Arizona
    Me too... I record almost every rehearsal, and some practice sessions.
    As a comeback player myself (11-1/2 months in after a 19 year layoff) it is great to go back to old clips and see progress in something.
    I use a Yamaha W24 Recorder... plus I can play duets with myself!
     
  9. TrumpetMD

    TrumpetMD Fortissimo User

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    I do that, too, often with the Arbans duets. :)

    Very nice. I was using a Sony Digital Recorder, but recently upgraded to a Zoom H1.

    Mike
     

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