Comeback player needs advice!(rather long)

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by guitarsrmine, Oct 14, 2009.

  1. guitarsrmine

    guitarsrmine Piano User

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    Dec 29, 2008
    Franklin, Pa
    I started on the comeback trail last December after nearly 30 yrs away from the trumpet. I bought a new horn,got some excersise material, bought an etude book, and was up to a 1 hour practice regiment. I was also plaing twice a week at church. Well, when summer got here, things changed. The band at church takes summers off, and then I was working 2 part time jobs-one was watching 3 kids for 11 hours a day, plus I'm working with a 26 year old Autistic boy who also has cerebral palsy. Needless to say, at the end of the day, the last thing on my mind was practicing. So, for the last month, I;m back to playing at church, and practice has resumed here. Now I'm only working part time, so I cant afford any online lessons, which I feel I could probably benefit from. Are there any instruction books that any of you could suggest that could help me? I'm happy with my tone, for the most part, but my range is probably not my strong point. Before my "summer break", I did manage to hit "F" above high C, but now its a struggle to hit C above the staff. I'm not looking for any magic potion that will have me playing like Maynard in a month- I just want to increase my range. I just want a good, reliable method to use so I know I'm doing things right. Pops McLaughlin? Keith Fiala? Please, I welcome and appreciate all of your input!!:play:
     
  2. ccNochops

    ccNochops Piano User

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    Sep 30, 2006
    White Marsh, VA
    Arban's and Clarke books and patience. After a 30 year break, I'm back now for three years and things are really just now starting to look up. Patience, it does come back, just not as fast as we would like it to....chuck
     
  3. guitarsrmine

    guitarsrmine Piano User

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    Dec 29, 2008
    Franklin, Pa
    Can I find the Arban and Clarkes book on Amazon? Are there different versions, ex. Beginner, intermediate, advanced? And I know I need to be patient. I am-I just wanna make sure that I'm doing things the right way. When I was learning trumpet 40 years ago, my teacher was a woodwind major, so there was probably tons of stuff I needed help with but never got-thats what I'm looking for now. Thanks for the replies!!:play:
     
  4. hichez

    hichez Pianissimo User

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    Jul 13, 2009
    Lets but it this way when you played trumpet in grade school I doubt you were able to hit C above the staff with a proper tone in 3 years. What makes it different now. It like if you ever broke a bone in the body your muscle is really weak and that's only after 6-10 weeks. Just imagine what would happen to a muscle after 3 years.

    30 years is a lot of time patience.
     
  5. hichez

    hichez Pianissimo User

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    Jul 13, 2009
    double post my bad
     
  6. ComeBackKid

    ComeBackKid Fortissimo User

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    May 11, 2009
    Yorba Linda, CA
    If there are no used copies on Amazon, you might check ebay. I had my original Arban's book (1936 edition) that I bought when I started back in the 50's and it still works fine. I think the new ones have a CD but I am not sure what is on it. If it has audio clips of someone playing the exercises, that may be very useful. I find that if I can hear someone playing it first, it is much easier for me to pick up (I guess I play primarily by ear even though I can read music).

    I have not used the Clarke book but the Arban book covers everything from beginning to very advanced. The trick is to realize that you do not start on page 1 and just go through the book sequentially. Every different section starts at the elementary (more-or-less) level. So, I find that if I put a sticky-note at the beginning of each section as a marker, when I practice I can take each tab in order and play something at the beginning of that section. I still have the hope that someday I can play the second page of each section. But, patience...(sigh!)

    Good luck. It sounds like you have the determination so just keep on keepin' on.
     
  7. jsmahnke

    jsmahnke New Friend

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    Aug 14, 2009
    I, too, am a comeback player, having picked up my horn in July after 20 years. I have been using a copy of an out-of-print book called Total Range. With dedication and patience, and acceptance that it may only take you so far (don't push it). It is no longer in print, but it is basically a series of lip drills (see Max Schlossberg, Daily Trumpet Drills), finger drills (see see Clarke Technical Studies, #1), and a series of long tones. I use it as a 45 - 60 minute warm-up every day. I had never previously taken long tones seriously as a young trumpet player. I now believe that they are the key to building your embouchure and extending your range. If I have time, I add Clarke's drill #2 after the long-tones. Total Range is nice because it is a condensed book and pulls these warm-up drills all together, but it also may be why it is no longer in print. To cut to the chase, in addition, I suggest adding Max Schlossberg lip slurs and many long tones to your daily warm-up. Work your long tones up the scale slowly. But don't move up the scale until you can play the next higher half note long tone relaxed, and repeatedly. Don't force it. Another important consideration is to include a 4, 6, or 8 count rest between phrases in each drill to keep the blood flowing to your lips.
     
  8. edcon1981

    edcon1981 Mezzo Forte User

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    Jun 25, 2008
    Central Jersey
    about two years ago i was a come backer. i started off small, practicing for an a couple of hours once or twice a week.

    then i started taking private lessons once a week with the director of my brass band. he's given me some awesome advice and direction... one of which was that he forbid me from my 1-2 hour twice a week practice schedule and made me practice for only 15-30 minutes each day. this prevents me from developing any bad habits due to fatigue. another thing he made me do was to keep the horn, stand, and music out of their cases so it's easier to practice and so i'm always reminded to practice.

    i guess what i'm sayin is to start easy then slowly build yourself up. before i started with the new practice regiment i would find it hard to make it through a three hour rehearsal... now i find myself wanting MORE than the three hours.
     
  9. nordlandstrompet

    nordlandstrompet Forte User

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    Apr 5, 2008
    Norway
    Finally Ed Con has escaped from the Blue(s) Midgets
    and their dreaded holy mackerels....

    Good to see you back!
     
  10. edcon1981

    edcon1981 Mezzo Forte User

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    Jun 25, 2008
    Central Jersey
    hah! yes, i finally broke free of the bonds that held me fast. those damn blues midgets... they're recruiting, there were six of them this time!

    and i'm back as long as my company doesn't block this site... we'll see how that goes ;)
     

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