Comeback skill acquisition.

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by oldlou, Oct 2, 2005.

  1. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

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    At one time, MANY years ago I was a fairly proficient cornetist. This was while I was in high school and college. Now, some forty years later, after zero contact with my instruments, I have decided that at the age of 69 years I would pick up my horn and give it another try. My greatest problem relates to reading the chart. If given a second to translate from what the chart is saying into what my brain tells my fingers, tongue, and lips to do, I do fairly well, but, if there is a fast scale, or multiple changes of key in a short space of time, I get lost quickly. I guess that the best way I can describe this is to liken it to coming back to a foreign language that a person was once fluent with and trying to read and comprehend it rapidly, without translating it in ones mind while reading. This is what I am experiencing. I see the spot on the chart and must make a decision as to what I am required to do, instead of what I once did, just react to the spot on the paper without concious thought as to what to do.
    Now for my question. How do I cure this problem rapidly? Is there no way other than to spend more time sight reading unfamiliar music?

    OLDLOU>>
     
  2. 11thchair

    11thchair Pianissimo User

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    Jan 27, 2005
    Evansville In
    Similar situation - except: I was not very good in HS and did play beyond that. Skills are improving all the time. Really started to pick up speed when I joined the community band. Gave me a reason to practice, and a bunch of fun. Still get lost every now and then, miss a key change, and blow a solo. No one has put a contract on me out yet.
     
  3. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    What you are seeking to retrieve from your memory banks is the able to recognize 1) rhythmic patterns and 2) scale and arpeggiatted chord patterns.

    The best way to do this is to use the chord patterns in Arbans starting somewhere around 145 and ending around 152-3. A daily diet of that sort of thing and also going back to the syncopated studies but playing them in a jazz style is helpful for you, since it sounds like that's the kind of music you're interested in right now. There are many books that incorporate what I've just talked about and Wilmer, PH, and Joey will have a lot to say about what's available. Oliver Nelson's book on patterns is alcso excellent but I think that's more for improv training. Listening to records is great but you need some eye coordination material so you can sightread.

    ML
     
  4. oldlou

    oldlou Forte User

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    Notes from a comebacker

    You are mistaken as to my choice of music styles. I am much more interested in symphonic band arrangements. I think that your advice will still be valid. Thank you.

    OLDLOU>>
     
  5. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

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    Sorry, Lou... I got confused after reading a similar post from someone else and then answering yours.

    ML
     

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