Conn Models with Two-toned Valve Casings

Discussion in 'Vintage Trumpets / Cornets' started by loce1959, Mar 21, 2015.

  1. loce1959

    loce1959 New Friend

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    Mar 2, 2013
    Would anyone have a list of Conn models with Brass/Copper valve casings. Tried Conn Loyalist useful but can be confusing. Any help appreciated.
     
  2. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    I used to have a 1925 22B with the copper-bottomed valve cases, if that helps any.
     
  3. harleyt26

    harleyt26 Mezzo Forte User

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    I think maybe all of them made between 1923 and 1925. Its hard to tell from the outside if it is silver or gold plated. 22B, 24B, 25B, 26B, 27B, 28B, and 80A, probably several others too.

    Here is a picture of my 1923 22B, I have a 1924 waiting to be cleaned and polished it looks identical but no Bb/A stop rod.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Bochawa!!!

    Bochawa!!! Forte User

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    Actually it's '22 to '25. In the second half of '25 the alloy was changed from copper to phosphor bronze. This roughly coincides with when model numbers began to be stamped on the instruments. Copper was used on virtually all models in this time period . . . 22B, 24/25B, 26/27B, 28/29B and cornet models of the day, including those that were silver or gold plated. Here's how you can tell on a plated model if the outside finish is not worn enough to see it . . .

    [​IMG]
    picture by Randy Cole
     
  5. loce1959

    loce1959 New Friend

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    Mar 2, 2013
    Thanks so much guys. You guys are so quick and thorough with your information. Are there any sites ( other than this one and Conn Loyalist) or books that you could recommend. I am currently buying and refurbishing for my kiddos in band who can't afford better horns. These really play and sound great.
     
  6. harleyt26

    harleyt26 Mezzo Forte User

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    Some of these models are high pitch, some are low pitch and some could be both. The complication is to find out which ones would not be suitable for your kids in band. We did not know why you were asking. I recommend sticking with the 22B models for that purpose.
     
  7. loce1959

    loce1959 New Friend

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    Mar 2, 2013
    Thanks. Hope this isn't a dumb question, but does high pitch and low pitch relate to bore size?
     
  8. loce1959

    loce1959 New Friend

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    Mar 2, 2013
    Just researched. Low pitch=A440 and high pitched=A452. Thanks for pointing it out. Wouldn't have thought of that.
     
  9. Tarh331_Dad

    Tarh331_Dad Piano User

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    Vintage CONN Elkhart trumpets pretty much SOUND better than about 99.99999% of all the other piston-driven trumpets ever made.

    [DISCLAIMER: As of today, I know diddly-squat about the acoustics of rotary-driven horns, like they use in much of Europe.]

    The big beef among modern trumpet players seems to be that the vintage CONN horns [with the exception of the early 2B New World Symphony and the later Connstellations] lack a tuning "saddle" on the 1st valve tuning slide.

    And they also don't have springs to automatically "pull back" the valve tuning slides.

    Which didn't seem to bother anyone until circa 1975.
     
  10. Tarh331_Dad

    Tarh331_Dad Piano User

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    Jan 14, 2014
    Also, do not overlook the CONN cornets!

    The cornet was actually the instrument which CONN built its reputation on, circa 1875 to 1925, and the cornet seems to have been the company's pride and joy, even through to the end of the Greenleaf era.

    Modern trumpet players [who all seem to be unified in some weird group-hysteria outburst of metrosexual idolatry and prostration before the Whore-of-Babylon Lilith which is the 37 Mandrel in 0.459] look upon the cornet with disdain, but the cornet is a vastly more flexible instrument than the trumpet, capable of producing a much broader spectrum of colors [especially the CONN long cornets - which can be made to run the gamut of sound timbres from "French Horn" to "Piccolo Trumpet"].
     

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