Conn Victor ?

Discussion in 'Vintage Trumpets / Cornets' started by harleyt26, Jan 20, 2011.

  1. harleyt26

    harleyt26 Mezzo Forte User

    928
    336
    Dec 9, 2009
    Summerfield,Fl.
    I am connfused by the designation "Victor" on several Conn model horns. I have a few Conn horns marked with the "Victor" title,one is a 1921 Victor New Wonder,engraved in the bell. It is top sprung. I have seen several New Wonder cornets without the "Victor' on the horn,what would the difference be bewteen the ones with it and the ones without.
    I also have a pair of Victors 6A and 6B they are 1956 models,they are marked on the mouthpiece reciever with Victor A or B. They are bottom sprung. And I have heard of even newer ones.
    Is there something that all the models designated as a Victor have in common?
    Then there is the 80A cornet often refered to as a Victor but I have yet to see one with the name Victor on it. What makes it a Victor.
     
  2. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

    7,939
    6,992
    Jul 20, 2006
    Heart of Dixie
    I'd guess the various Victor models were named after Conn's early partner, Eugene Victor Baptiste Dupont. All early model Conns were "professional" models, and differed in design and features by model. The Victor name was applied to some of these. When student and intermediate model trumpets and cornets became popular, the Victor model was at or near the top of the line, sharing many features of the Connstellation (trumpet) later on. I can't really answer your specific questions, though. I own two Victors, a 1960 6B and a 1962 5A...fine instruments.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  3. edfitzvb

    edfitzvb Forte User

    2,276
    1,395
    Jun 10, 2008
    Woodlawn, VA
    I envy your 6B. I had one when I was young and traded it in on a used Strad that was later stolen from my car. I'm prowling, looking for one. It was a sweet playing horn.
     
  4. edfitzvb

    edfitzvb Forte User

    2,276
    1,395
    Jun 10, 2008
    Woodlawn, VA
    Just in case you haven't been here, try The Conn Loyalist at The Conn Loyalist as it has LOTS and LOTS of information, I don't remember if it addresses the Victor question per se, but there is a ton of info there.
     
  5. harleyt26

    harleyt26 Mezzo Forte User

    928
    336
    Dec 9, 2009
    Summerfield,Fl.
    The Victor models came in a wide variety of bore sizes. The earliest ones were top sprung and the later ones were bottom sprung. There were trumpet and cornet models. Some with coprion bells or leadpipes or both. There were Conn horns such as the 22B and 2B that had no models with the Victor name on them. I have spent a great deal of time on The Conn Loyalist site but I have not read anything about this. The 80A being called the Victor is really what got my curiosity going. Since it is one model that does not have the Victor name on it. The earlier similar looking model "The Victor New Wonder" was a small bore top sprung horn while the 80A is large bore bottom sprung and only visually resembles the earlier horn.
     
  6. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

    16,128
    7,170
    Dec 22, 2008
    Virginia
    You should send Christine an e-mail. I've asked her several questions in the past and she is more than willing to help. What I know is that prior to 1955ish, all Victors were pro level horns. Conn's student line was called Pan American. When the Pan American name was dropped, enter the Director series (student level horns). This is when it gets murky because Conn had so many models trying to be all things to all players, the Victor name was supplanted by the Connstellation. It (Victor) was still a pro level horn, but I'm guessing with the intro of the Connstellation series, the Victor was yesterdays news even though it was just as good as it had been in the past. I have two 80As. One from 1942 and the other 1954 and they are both excellent players. Hope this helps.
     
  7. plp

    plp Pianissimo User

    185
    29
    Nov 9, 2003
    South Alabama
    To the best of my knowledge, the Victor has always been pro caliber. Different than whatever was top of the line flagship model at the time, but professional quality and design all the way.

    I have two 1967 80-A Victors, as well as several going back as far as 1919, and the quality of build and tonal palette is right up there with the Connstellations.
     
  8. gzent

    gzent Fortissimo User

    3,725
    755
    Nov 5, 2003
    Rochester, MN
    FYI the 6A I bought is top sprung.
     
  9. harleyt26

    harleyt26 Mezzo Forte User

    928
    336
    Dec 9, 2009
    Summerfield,Fl.
    The 6A and 6B early models were bottom sprung (I have both models) after 1957 they changed them to be much more like the Connstellation,top sprung, plus they went to a coprion leadpipe instead of brass. One of the advatages of the early model 6A was the mouthpiece reciever would accept a short or long shank mouthpiece. The early short shank mouthpieces were most commonly a large deep or V bowl allowing for a very dark smoky sound. You can find these large bowls in the long shank but they are not as common and quite often are fairly expensive. I think all the Conn cornets from around 55-57 would accept both that was the transition period from short to long shank. During that period the new cornet may have been delivered with either one.
     
  10. trumpetup

    trumpetup Piano User

    318
    32
    Jan 12, 2009
    Godley, Texas
    My late 50's 80A has Victor on the mouth peice lead pipe.
    -Bobby
     

Share This Page