Consequences of Time Off

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Comeback, Aug 11, 2013.

  1. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    There are millions of these sax players around ...... All we have to do is convert a respectable percentage of them, and we'll all get rich! Those of us who have excesses of trumpets lying around, that is. Yes .... BUSTED. You are one smart dude to uncover my plan so quickly. Am I that transparent??? Oh, the humanity.

    Turtle
     
  2. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    So far, it's going very well ....... In terms of "losing one's chops", the sax is somewhere in between the extremely demanding trumpet, and the not at all demanding guitar. You have to lay off playing guitar for a very very long time before losing much of anything, except maybe the calloused pads on your fretting fingers.

    I recently had to stop playing the sax for 2 weeks, because of a weird mosaic art accident, in which I got stabbed in the hand by a very sharp shard of stained glass (I'm not kidding). Luckily there was no nerve damage, but after two weeks missed, I had some work getting back to where I was. Doesn't mean you lose any range, in fact, right off, in the first month, I had a three octave range. That's part of the appeal of the sax, it's easier to get going on it and mere mortals, you know, the ones who can't play trumpet, can play this instrument. The uppermost part of that range, while the notes come out quickly, the fingering is difficult.

    It seems to me there are many similarities in facial muscles that are needed, but the sax is less demanding and you really just need a very stiff lower lip. Counterintuitive, I know, for some Brits, who are used to the need for a stiff UPPER lip. The tenor sax (the only one, really, worth considering) is a perfect doubling instrument for trumpeters, in Bb, and I wonder why more don't do it. :dontknow:


    Turtle
     
  3. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Maybe that explains the popularity of all-brass bands in the commonwealth...;-)
     
  4. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    Personally, I think that the sax should be considered a brass instrument .... I mean, hello!, it's 99.9 percent brass and only the tiniest fraction is wood, and even that could be something else these days, like plastic. Woodwind??? Doesn't make any sense.


    Turtle
     
  5. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    It's all in the mouthpiece...a Sax with a cup mouthpiece becomes a brass instrument...an ophicleide.
     
  6. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

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    This advice was given to me as well by my boss, the poor speller and dependent of editing. It was very helpful and yes, it worked. It gives you even more strength the more you smother the mouthpiece with the towel.
     
  7. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

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    This one stumps me folks! Can I have a show of hands as to the meaning of "faultrer". I have nothing here!
    Sorry Doc. Couldn't let that pitch right down the middle go. I had to take a swing and knock it out of the park!!!!
     
  8. BigDub

    BigDub Fortissimo User

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    YAY!!!!!!!
    Turtle's back. I missed you brother.
     
  9. turtlejimmy

    turtlejimmy Utimate User

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    HI BIG DUB!

    Here you go ....... "faultrer": n, One, whose lip fails to buzz, due to time off.


    :D


    Turtle
     
  10. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    Welcome back, T-man! You've been missed!

    Time off can be good, allowing some bad habits to atrophy. Word on the street is that Adolph Herseth would take a couple weeks off in the summer,"kicking his trumpet under the bed" and telling it to stay there. He would ease his way back into playing by doing some mouthpiece buzzing at the golf course--it was worth a couple of strokes, he said.
     

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