Consistency of Articulation/Articulation Model

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by fnchdrms87, Mar 20, 2008.

  1. fnchdrms87

    fnchdrms87 New Friend

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    Apr 18, 2006
    Andrew,

    How would you recommend one going about refining their articulation approach and the consistency of their articulation?

    FD
     
  2. amtrpt

    amtrpt Pianissimo User

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    Hi,
    The first thing that I try to keep in mind is that for me my best articulation is an interruption of the air. What I really don't want to do is let my tounging dictate how I use my air. Imagine a fan blowing. Now pass your hand in front of the fan. Or course the air from the fan stays the same. Another example is throwing a pebble in a running stream. The water continues it's forward progress. I think that is the most important part of having a clear and reliable ariculation.
    Now when I want to think specifically about how I use my tounge to articulate there are a few exercises that I like to think about. Here's the one I like the best.
    First decide what kind af articulation you want to use, short, medium, long etc. Then take any scale. Put the metronome on quarter note equals 60. Play the first of the scale for four beats in a repeated triplet pattern and then a quarter note on the first beat of the next measure. Then rest for three beats. Then the next note etc. Go up and down the scale, then arpeggiate the scale. Try to really listen to the quality and consistency of articulation. Also be very careful to keep the air moving forward. If you want to make sure you are using the air correctly play the first two beats of each measure as a half note, then two beats of triplets. You can use this idea with any rhythmic pattern you want.
    I hope that this is clear enough and that you find it helpful
    Best,
    Andrew
     
  3. fnchdrms87

    fnchdrms87 New Friend

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    Apr 18, 2006
    thanks for your reply!
     
  4. gtromble

    gtromble Pianissimo User

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    1 minute single-tonguing exercise -- a la Chris Gekker

    mid-staff G
    metronome on, say q=80
    play 16th notes for 1 minute, breathing when necessary (skipping a couple of beats is fine, just take a relaxed breath and start again)

    make the notes consistent in articulation and sound

    at some point during the minute, your tongue may tire so you can't keep up
    if you're good at that tempo, skootch it up the next day

    once a day, every day
    you'll be amazed at how it improves your playing - just don't push the tempo -- it isn't a race -- it's more about the consistency of a good articulation
     
  5. amtrpt

    amtrpt Pianissimo User

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    Great idea! Thanks for the information.
    Andrew
     
  6. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Foreign languages has made me aware of different types of articulation. When playing in an articulate manner we are singing or speaking through the horn. The language helps not only the start and end of a tone, but the "color" in between too!

    There is another thread buried here at TM on language vs articulation. probably spurred on by Rafael Mendez's brilliant speed and clarity. The question was if the mother language helps or hurts. What came out I think, was if the mother or father was articulate, the children had a better chance.........

    Practice speaking articulately too. If your voice becomes clear and precise, you have an excellent model for trumpet playing. Precision practicing pays off!
     
  7. brem

    brem Mezzo Forte User

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    So which language best suits you Rowuk? :)
     
  8. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    it depends if I am trying to spit flames, knock walls down, seduce my audience....................
     
  9. fnchdrms87

    fnchdrms87 New Friend

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    Apr 18, 2006
    i find in my playing I generally lack a clear front to each note. When playing something like the opening of the Haydn or Honegger intrada, I find it difficult to make sure all notes are evenly, cleanly and clearly articulated with the same amount of front or "ping" to each note. Mr. McCandless, I guess sitting in the back of an orchestra you have to tongue harder than usual. I have had many orchestral players tell me to "tongue the snot out of it"
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2008
  10. amtrpt

    amtrpt Pianissimo User

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    I'm not sure if I would say you should "tounge the snot out of it". There are certainly times when I use more tounge than I would if I were up close. For me it's much more important to have great coordination between the air and the tounge. If I have that then my tounging will get more and more clear the louder I play. Go for clarity first, then let the volume and impact follow.
    Andrew
     

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