control in the low range

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Young Trumpeter, Nov 12, 2006.

  1. Young Trumpeter

    Young Trumpeter Pianissimo User

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    Jun 10, 2006
    im a student in high school and i find that when i'm practicing some of my more heavy duty lip slurs that i have trouble controling the notes generally below the staff. the slurs are unclean and i overshoot them a lot and my intonation is terrible. any advice? thanks.
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    High Young,
    how long have you been playing and what does your current daily routine look like?
    Please define "overshoot" below the staff(there is actually only the pedal tones left?????????). Can you play those notes sustained - cleanly and in tune?
     
  3. Eclipsehornplayer

    Eclipsehornplayer Forte User

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    The best advice I can give you is this.

    Without seeing you play of course I'm guessing at what the problem may be this is my best guess.

    You must make sure you keep your embouchure stable. I found that before I had found a teacher for myself I had a bad habit of loosening up my embouchure when descending below the staff. Kinda like the horse whinny thing you know; face and lips looser the lower I went. You must keep your corners tight! The cure for this for me was James Thompson's buzzing book which I still use. It gave me the idea of one embouchure and better tone.

    Yes, your embouchure will not need to be as taught as you'd have it when you ascend above the staff; but non-the-less you must keep it somewhat taught no matter what direction you go in.

    Hope this helps.
    John
     
  4. Young Trumpeter

    Young Trumpeter Pianissimo User

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    Jun 10, 2006
    My daily routine consists of long tones, mouthpiece buzzing, lip slurs, and scales. to go into detail on this would take way too long (especially the lip slurs, which i do 6-7 different excercises for). by "overshooting" i mean that if i were to slur from lets say low G to D i would go higher than supposed to and hit the next partial up or the D would be extremely sharp. i experience this on many of the partials around the bottom or below the staff, but i don't practice that much on pedal tones so i'm not including those (so for example from low A to E, G to D, F# to C#, etc). i can play those notes alone fairly stable and fairly intune. what i mean by fairly is that my intonation is not great but the tunor tells me that i'm on the right note and i can get it somewhat close to centered. its not like i'm radically sharp or flat.
     
  5. MrClean

    MrClean Piano User

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    Perhaps you are opening up too much on the low G, then are having to make a big motion to try to pop the D out. Try this and see where it gets you: play a few beats of repeated 16th notes up on an F or G (good, centered sound - no splintering of notes) at the top of the staff. Immediately reach down with that "set" to your low G and try your slur.

    J
     
  6. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    A trick that seems to work with all lip slurs is to find the "middle" note (the note between the two slurred e.g. with a g to d slur, the middle note would be b [or bb]), memorize the "feel" and "set" and everything else you notice about the note. and use this as your center point. With this mind-set, the low g stops being a "low g" and becomes a note a little way below your center and the d becomes a little way above your center. This will help firm up the feeling of notching between the two notes. This trick works in the upper register too. Have fun!
     
  7. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    YT,
    assuming your trumpet is decent and your mouthpiece not too radical, what you describe is fairly common. It happens when you do not have enough breath support and change your air/chops for high and low notes.

    Try SLOW slurs : take a BIG breath - do not hold the air in - start playing right away without tonguing - lowC-G-lowC-G-lowC. Go through the valve combinations (2, 1, 12, 23, 13, 123). After you have MASTERED this exercize slowly, increase speed. Patience is the solution here. Getting your airflow "massive" and your breathing right are critical for everything else that comes later. Once you can play this exercise reasonably fast, you can add a note to the top: low C-G-C-G-lowC and go through the valve combinations. My students with air issues play their entire lessons without tonguing - just to learn to keep the air moving. Cutting that sound into pieces with the tongue later is easy once the airflow works!

    Start every day SLOWLY! Think about and play fat, clean sounds. Impatience is one sure way to impede your development. Being anxious to get to the next level keeps you motivated.
     

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