Corners

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by BobtheBigFoot, Oct 26, 2011.

  1. BustedChops

    BustedChops Mezzo Forte User

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    I have the same problem. The discipline to learn to relax is really helping me. Remember mouthpiece pressure is not your friend. Keeping a tight lip and holding it there is not the way to go. Your lips need to buzz freely. It's easier said than done. Believe me. I just shot my chops tightly puckering to belt out the upper register.

    Now I'm on break for the next 20 minutes :)

    I think the best way to imagine the mechanics is that your lips are the motor buzzing...lumpity lumpity lump lump...like a wild v8 camshaft. And your mouth and air passage are the cylinder walls. Do not rely on mouthpiece pressure to aid in the compression of your engine. You will prematurely wear the walls of embouchure and your foundation will crumble.

    Good luck...Yes I just hit super high tea kettle sounds...Now I just did that because I did exactly what I told you not to do...Relax...relax...Keep your engine in tune.
     
  2. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    How long have you been playing? It does sound that you are trying to play beyond what your lips are ready to do
     
  3. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Bob, just hold your trumpet in front of you as far away as you can reach. Hold it there and not move it for 15 minutes. Yes, I know your arms will the ache painfully. Such is just an example of holding any muscle in a tensed position. My question is where are you getting your breath, if not from the corners? From what you've stated I'm not expecting you to tell me YOU ARE breathing in at the corners. Somewhere along the line the admonition of "tight corners" is an overkill. IMO all that it means is the lip from mouthpiece to corner is sealed when you produce a note viz all your air is exhaled directly into the mouthpiece. Goodness me, don't tell me you are inhaling theough your nose while playiing. This may be fine while pursing other activity, but it is not ample enough or fast enough for playing a brass instrument and such is just an axiom of physics viz the airway is smaller through the nasal passage.
     
  4. MTROSTER

    MTROSTER Piano User

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    That's the same as texting while driving. You're looking for trouble.
    DR. Mike
     
  5. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    noooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  6. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Not really. You only have to do this 10,000 times to get it down!
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    OR say no 10,000 times to REALLY convince yourself you do not need to work!
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Not true, this technique as I read your description is called "circular breathing", I use it quit often and must say, it is particularly effective when playing the blues.
     
  9. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    When texting your eyes focus much on the keyboard in addition to all I see so are both hands, err ... thumbs mostly on the keyboard. Frankly, I don't want to be on the same road with such a driver or anyway near a road on which his /her vehicle is traveling.

    Mouthpiece buzzing, I don't suppose is much different than smoking (cigarettes, cigars, or pipes), except I've never respnded to a crash where someone buzzing dropped a hot ash in their private areas and the consequence was disaster. I've heard such when the driver was smoking more than once and in none of these I responded to resulted in injury or fatality. Please, please eyes on the road, hands on the wheel, and ears attuned to hear emergency vehicle sirens.
     
  10. tobylou8

    tobylou8 Utimate User

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    Sometimes there's a little drool that dribbles onto your lap. Has embarrassment potential depending on the destination. :oops:
     

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