Corners

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by BobtheBigFoot, Oct 26, 2011.

  1. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Have had that effect while playing and excess oil from valves doesn't dry readily. Smart enough to wear black pants most of the time. When driving look out for loose doggie "drool" also. Leastwise, some old timers now wear incontinent protection.
     
  2. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    The old adage of don't do as I do, do as I say applies. I do it as much as I can, especially now for the optimum of natural air filtration. Works well with phrasing in slower songs. Still ain't gonna teach it as it isn't satisfactory with most songs and introducing such initiates a habit that is hard to break and corner lip breathing always works.

    Maybe when I get older I'll conduct a research study to correlate brass player breathing through the mouth with deep snoring and sleep apnea. At this time it is just my observation of a tendency for such with myself as an example. Now I spend hours at a time purposely inhaling through the nose and exhaling through the mouth just as the swim coach advises. My pulmonologist does agree that I've had significant improvement in the past year, but I suppose mostly it is my wife who is amazed that I seldom snore anymore ... but she continues to do so. Personally, I feel that I'm now sleeping better and that's enough to make me happy.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    You have to do it 10,000 times CORRECTLY to get it down. If the first 5000 are wrong, you have a major issue!
     
  4. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The nose is always the first choice when we have time. The air is then filtered, moistened and the temperature is adjusted. There is no law saying we always have to inhale energetically. If we get in tune with our bodies, more air moves through the nose than we normally assume. If we have upper body tension, the efficiency goes way down
     
  5. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    Regarding breathing in through the nose, Bob Lambert, the great Chicago Symphony principal trombone player in the 50s and 60s, would breathe through his nose after setting his embouchure when he had an entrance in a high register. He did this so he would not worry if this embouchure was set properly by breathing in before setting the embouchure.
    Vince Chicowicz also felt this technique to have that benefit.
    As long as your sinuses are not blocked, this way of taking a quick breath does work well. If you breathe from low in the lungs, you can easily take in enough air to start a phrase in the upper register or a get quick intake to finish a long phrase. If time permits, a full breath can be accomplished with your embouchure set and an intake through the nose.
    I know many professional brass players who use this technique when the situation calls for it.
    Rich T.
     
  6. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    Number 1 (as I've inserted) above poses the crux of reliabilty due to adverse medical conditions not exclusive to allergies and colds that seemingly sneak up on us.


    Number 2 and I've enhanced professional, whereof I believe the set of the embouchure should have become second nature and no present concern to a pro, and I just don't take a stand upon what or how pros do, a beginner can do also. This ain't sayin' breathing through the nose is wrong when playing, as I often do it myself when I can, it's just not universal to everyone at all times. Breathing from "deep in the lungs" is also not an instant capability for a beginner and is something that needs to be taught, learned, and developed over time ... often years. There is considerable diversity among players as to what they can do and what they cannot yet do and the teacher / tutor attempts only to improve upon the latter and utilizes the methods that work best for each student. Yep, I'm stickin' to breathing from the corners of the mouth in teaching a beginner and seemingly it seems to presently be working although there is always room for improvement and variance. As among many, if not most, is PRACTICE and for this I wish there was a mirror set on top of the music stand beginning students use, that a glimpse of their eyes could reveal how their embouchure etc. appears.
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Those bar fights really take their toll as a result of that deviated nasal septum, right Vulgano Brother?
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    Not to mention the trumpet teacher that is either becoming suicidal or homicidal.
     
  9. richtom

    richtom Forte User

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    There is a wonderful book by Luis Loubriel on the teachings of Vincent Chicowicz. It is called Back to Basics for Trumpeters.
    This remarkable tome on Chicowicz's teachings should be on every serious trumpeter's shelf. There is much to learn from this book.
    In regards to nose breathing, Mr. Chicowicz believed that was a very fine method to teach beginners. His reasoning was young players instinctively hold their lips together. After they develop the necessary embouchure strength and coordination, they can then learn breathing through the corners.
    In the case of advanced players, nose breathing nose breathing does hold the embouchure in position for a more secure high tessitura entrance.
    Here is a passage from the book.
    "2. Timofei Dokshizer wrote in his method book (Integrated Exercise System published by Alphonse Leduc) that to prevent brakeage (sp) of sound in the upper register, the player should keep his or her lips still. To help this, he suggested breathing through the nose before playing a high entry note".
    Rich T.
     
  10. Ed Lee

    Ed Lee Utimate User

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    It was a left hook that got me when I rolled open to throw a left upper cut all the way from the floor. While such deviated my nasal septum the third time, my upper cut connected for TKO. Never learned of my opponent's medical injury but neither of us then continued on our respective boxing team. This time I didn't get my septum reset again (no insurance coverage). Never been in or even saw a bar fight, though veiwed the aftermath of one in a morgue autopsy, death by blunt force truma causing fractured skull from whiskey bottle, scalp lacerations inclusive ( a requirement of my LEO training ). Still The consequences haven't impaired my capability to play my brass horns enough that I now consider such to be detrimental. I just add it to my halloween and clown funny face appearance.
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2011

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