Cornet compatability question

Discussion in 'Mouthpieces / Mutes / Other' started by Padders, Nov 14, 2017 at 6:49 AM.

  1. Padders

    Padders New Friend

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    I've just bought a used Blessing XL in reasonably good condition. With my mouthpiece - a cheap but perfectly reasonable (at least in other cornets) Gewa 1.5c short shank - it's fine from D upwards, but low C and the notes below just don't seem to want to play. With the slide pulled out by about an inch it all comes right.

    The cornet is a shepherds crook design. I've diagnosed that I need a longer shank mouthpiece to make it work, it being a US cornet. Am I right?
     
  2. sj3209

    sj3209 Piano User

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    Sounds like it's you not the equipment. I had a guy in my band that has that problem all the time playing a Bach 43 with a Marcinkiewicz mouthpiece. I always thought to myself, "Who can't play low notes?"
     
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  3. Padders

    Padders New Friend

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    Maybe. The thing is, I can play them all day long on my trumpet, and I can play them perfectly happily with that mouthpiece in another cornet. And by pulling out the slide, thus making them a bit lower, I can play them without difficulty on that cornet.
     
  4. Dennis78

    Dennis78 Fortissimo User

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    Some horns are different. And cornets in particular seem very sensitive to mouthpiece selection
     
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  5. ButchA

    ButchA Pianissimo User

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    Dennis is right... :thumbsup:

    My '75 Olds Ambassador (off eBay) sounded like a trumpet with the common, standard, Bach 7C MP. It wasn't until I bought that (no letter) Conn 3 from mouthpiece express's eBay site, that the real sound of a cornet came through.

    You all remember, I picked up that old '75 Ambassador off eBay for a steal - reason being, it had no MP. So, I had to do what I had to do in order to play it/test it out/etc..etc.. That only MP in stock at the local music store was a cornet 7C - and even then, they only had ONE!
     
  6. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Are you sure the cornet is clean and in good repair? Make sure the water keys are sealing correctly and the valves are aligning with the ports properly. Does the mouthpiece fit the receiver properly and insert the correct distance? The length of the mouthpiece shouldn't really make a difference in ease of playing low notes.
     
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  7. Padders

    Padders New Friend

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    A good clean certainly wouldn't hurt it.
     
  8. Gendreauj

    Gendreauj Piano User

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    Have you tried other mouthpieces on this cornet? Having a professional cleaning and maybe new corks may be helpful. All the cornets I have owed are mouthpiece sensitive .
     
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  9. Padders

    Padders New Friend

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    I gave it a bit of a once over last night and it did make a difference. Maybe you're right.

    Thanks for your insights and advice folks. I had thought that the length of the shank affected the effective length of the leadpipe and thus the entire tuning and function of the instrument. Maybe I'm wrong. I'll put it in the bath later and see what that does.
     
  10. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    You're sort of on the right track, but a properly-designed short cornet mouthpiece (like a Wick) should not affect the "normal" tuning slide position. The reason some cornet mouthpieces are short is to counteract the tendency of a big, deep cup and a huge throat to play flat. A standard C-cup 27-throat mouthpiece with a short shank will tend to play sharp, though. However, it would just make the cornet play sharp, not cut off the lower register entirely (unless you're trying to lip it in tune and compromising your embouchure).
     
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