Cornet is flat

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by PatMurphy, Jul 10, 2011.

  1. PatMurphy

    PatMurphy Pianissimo User

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    In addition to a Callet Jazz trumpet which is just OK, I am attempting to play a Holton Committee Elkhart with a Bach 3-c mouthpiece

    I love the full sound of the cornet and an willing to accept the apparent 2-3 note reduced upper register but I have to keep the tuning slide tight in to get close to being in tume. I feel I am bending the notes sharp to stay in tume and so do not get the full winderful tone the insrament is able to produce when I "exercise" it.

    In other words I seem to play flat with the cornet compared to
    when I play the a Bach 3-c mouthpiece on my trumpet.

    I had the same problem with the King super so I traded it in.

    I love having the different sound of the cornet vs. the trumpet but to get it to be in tune I seem to have to not allow the fill wonderful centered sound of the instrument out.
    What am I doing wrong?
     
  2. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Maybe you are doing nothing wrong. In bygone days A=438 was reality and the horns were built longer. Your problem can also be due to a mouthpiece mismatch.

    I had my 1911 Holton Clarke model long cornet cut down to play in tune here in Germany, where A=443 is normal, but was not possible with the horn. The valve slides also needed to be shortened too.
     
  3. PatMurphy

    PatMurphy Pianissimo User

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    I never thought of that. You memntion in "olden days" and my horn is a Martin Committee. I did not think they were that "olden".
     
  4. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Does your cornet mouthpiece go in as far as it should? Unlike most trumpets, cornets - even those from the mid-20th century - had varying diameters of mouthpiece receivers, some pretty small. Even with a mouthpiece that fit, I had an Olds cornet from the late 1940's that I cut about 3/8" off the main tuning slide to get it in tune. Older cornets are sometimes a crap shoot when it comes to tuning and intonation. Many times, they play pretty well with the original mouthpiece and are marginal with just about any other.
     
  5. PatMurphy

    PatMurphy Pianissimo User

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    I have spent a bit of time working on the Martin cornet to see where and why it is flat.
    I find it has a nice full tone qwhen I concentrate on centering the note in the low register.
    At C inthe staff it begins to go flat.
    I read the Monette web site with his theory of playing "high on the pitch" . It sounded like what I am experiencing. Anyone have a further thought? Is anyone using a Monete mouthpiece to cure this "flat" problem?
     
  6. Haste2

    Haste2 Piano User

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    Man, I simply HATE it when people try to make music sharper! Why do people like being sharp?! Just play IN TUNE!!!! Have mercy on those of us with perfect pitch! Have mercy on the instruments! Also, music going sharper makes it a bit tougher on trumpet players' endurance, too....
     
  7. PatMurphy

    PatMurphy Pianissimo User

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    I am not trying to play sharper. I can hear it go flat and I do not want to "bend" it sharp.
    I do not have this with my Callet Jazz
     
  8. VetPsychWars

    VetPsychWars Fortissimo User

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    Sounds like you might want to try a short-shank mouthpiece. Perhaps there is a Denis Wick that would work for you.

    Tom
     
  9. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    Hey man, what are you smokin?

    No one wants to be sharp or flat for that matter. There can be physical causes for wide area pitch inaccuracies. They can often be cured by minor changes to the instruments or mouthpieces.

    It makes no difference if I am playing in America at A=440, Frankfurt Germany at A=443 or Vienna Austria at A=445. It is equally tough performing at "historic pitches" like A=415 or 432.

    The pitch of the concert A does change the overall timbre of the orchestra. That gives them their characteristic "sound". Nothing to hate.
     
  10. Bob Grier

    Bob Grier Forte User

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    Sounds like the mpc may not be going in the receiver for enough. Yamaha makes short shank cornet mpcs. A yamaha 14C4 will have a rim close to your 3C.
     

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