Cornet random questions

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by frankmike, May 14, 2010.

  1. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Heart of Dixie
    Ouch!
     
  2. frankmike

    frankmike Piano User

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    Dec 5, 2008
    no, not ouch

    there are some incredibily fine sand papers, IMO its way better than chemicals.

    besides, what damage can it do? -I'm talking about extremly fine sandpapers, not the rough ones.
     
  3. guyclark

    guyclark Piano User

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    Feb 28, 2008
    Los Gatos, CA
    I'm sorry for being a bit of a downer :evil:, but why are you set on taking the finish off before you even play the thing? :shhh: I'd make sure it was worth the effort (or is it me that's worth the effort? ;-) ) before doing something as minimally helpful (and potentially harmful) as stripping lacquer.:dontknow:

    As for how to play the cornet, I'd say that you can muscle a trumpet, but you have to finesse a cornet. You have to "seduce" it, not force it, against it's will. Play it in a relaxed manner, and it will make beautiful music. :cool: Try to force it into a trumpet, and it will sound like... well.... bad.:shhh:

    Having played both Bb and Eb cornet in many brass bands, I know from first hand experience, the effects of both approaches. You want to know how cornet SHOULD sound? Find a recording of Roger Webster, Phillip McCann, or Russell Gray and hear what they sound like. :thumbsup: That's MY opinion, anyway!

    Guy Clark
     
  4. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Heart of Dixie
    Sandpaper is ouch to me, for both the brass and my fingers. The finer the paper, the more rubbing, and you WILL remove brass that way. If the hot water doesn't work, you'll never get the lacquer out of all the nooks and crannies on a horn with sandpaper. I've used spray Krylon OFF! paint remover on horns before to good effect. Take it outside, spray the horn down with the Krylon, and hose it off in a little while. It may take an application or two, but it's worked for me.

    Before (eBay ad)
    [​IMG]

    After
    [​IMG]

    Of course, the after picture involved a lot of polishing (with chemicals)...
     
  5. frankmike

    frankmike Piano User

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    ok, so basically I wont have major issues with my cornet performance, since flugel is generally easier for me to play, in particular high register (mine high C on flugel is the real tone, while on tpt more like a whisper of some sort)

    this is the cornet I bought (not that exactly but that model) it was built in early 1950s. It is Holton Collegiate. I got it for 70 bucks!

    [​IMG]
     
  6. frankmike

    frankmike Piano User

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    Hi Dale, nice restauration there. BUT what kind of cornet is that. Thats the most unusuall thing I've seen, all Bb cornets I saw had lead pipe that goes into 3rd valve first. But your is unusuall because lead pipe enters 1st valve first. How come? Whats that? Does it affect fingering? Is it maybe Eb cornet?
     
  7. trumpetnick

    trumpetnick Fortissimo User

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    Dale's cornet is Conn Victor - right Dale? Though the leadpipe wrap may not be the most common, I don't think that it is unique. Awesome restoration job. Bravo.
     
  8. tpsiebs

    tpsiebs Piano User

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    Feb 6, 2010
    Randolph, New Jersey
    1) Don't boil the cornet.
    2) Some folks can't tolerate raw brass against their skin - they will get a contact dermatitis that some people call "brass poisoning" Generally, hand contact is OK but lips can be problematic (thus mouthpieces are meant to be plated silver, gold or are inert materials like delryn or teflon).

    If you're taking the lacquer off simply for appearance sake, don't. No one cares what your horn looks like - just how you sound playing it.

    We can get into another whole "thing" about gold vs. silver, lacquer vs. non-lacquer, epoxy lacquer vs vintage organic. etc.

    Wait til you get the horn and then see if it plays. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.
     
  9. frankmike

    frankmike Piano User

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    well it already is missing lacquier where the hand goes, so If I get piosoning I will, but I doubt since I never had any problem with that. MPC is silver plated -why would I strip that? I was talking strictly about horn.

    Besides since I saw monette instruments (unfortunately I do not have that money) I always wanted raw brass instrument
     
  10. tpsiebs

    tpsiebs Piano User

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    Randolph, New Jersey
    Taking the lacquer off won't make anything play like a Monette. Nothing except a Monette plays like a Monette.

    Sorry you misinterpreted me. Let me try again for more clarity.

    I realize that you are not talking about stripping your mouthpiece - I brought up the lips simply because they are a much more sensitive expression of your skin (epidermis). Playing on a raw brass mouthpiece is a recipe for discontent for most anyone - and similarly (and this is my point), there are those with sensitive skin who cannot tolerate the interaction of raw brass and the sweat and acids of their hands. If you are among those individuals, raw brass might not be for you.

    You can play whatever finish you want to on your horn - Rustoleum, if you like. But IMO, everything affects everything. I am pretty certain that my Martins play like they do because of the synergy among many structural elements, design elements and finish elements. Were I to strip the horn, it would not play the same. Were I to re-lacquer with a modern epoxy, it would play far different than they do with the remainder original cellulose lacquer from the 1940's.

    Again, I would seriously recommend playing and understanding the instrument that you purchased before you go off and strip it simply because you always wanted (a) raw brass instrument. Please do some research and know WHAT stripping may do for you with respect to the horn's playing characteristics as that may help you determine if this decision jives with the "look" that you're seeking.
     

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