Cornet vs Trumpet method books

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Satchmo Brecker, May 25, 2011.

  1. bumblebee

    bumblebee Fortissimo User

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    I got my cornet when I joined a British brass band in the early 90's -- they just wouldn't accept my trumpet after the first day I tried out with them. I would say that there is no fundamental difference in what you have to learn but there is a noticeable difference in the experience of playing the two horn types. I have four trumpets and one cornet and the cornet feels the most different to all the horns.

    But my range is the same on both, same amount of air required etc. Mouthpieces are a bit different.

    --bumblebee
     
  2. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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    Cornets are traditionally for Brass Bands, and equate to the violin section. Same method of playing individually as a trumpet, but more of a choir effect IMO. A traditional band will have a difficult time accepting a trumpet to play the part, as the trumpet would ride over the tradional cornet sound.

    BTW cornets can sizzle ...Check Red Nichols and Bix for cornet players, and Louis Armstrong in the early days.

    They are old fashioned for most modern arrangements, but cornets have a more mellow sound than a trumpet, sort of between trumpet and flugelhorn. I like the Olds Super Cornet, just a wonderful sound. Besson Sovereign is the coverted Cornet "to have".

    BTW cornets are great for kids, easier to handle being compact/closer in weight to the body. Clark and Arbans go hand in hand for trumpet and cornet.

    They are still popular in British Brass Bands, and here in Australia they are still used in some Brass Bands (military etc). Trumpets are more popular. I still find arrangements that require Cornets and Trumpets...maybe one or two a years that come past the band. Most just play the trumpet for all...but that's missing the point of the sound required for the arrangement. There is still a place for both in my book. A good cornet player is usually grounded in Brass Bands (Salvos etc), can read the branding on any Bull at 100 metres, and can blend like a Barbers quartet for sections, and solo play well. But they are less common these days.
     
  3. Peter McNeill

    Peter McNeill Utimate User

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