Cornets and student learners - why are they so disregarded?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by motteatoj, Jun 13, 2013.

  1. graysono

    graysono Mezzo Forte User

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    Me too! But there are others out there which definitely are not stuffy. My Stomvi Elite, for example. With a Curry DC in it, I can play a la Ruby Braff, or peel the paint off the wall when I let it out. I switched to trumpet the other night in this little jam group I am a part of in which the rhythm is carried by guitar. It actually felt wrong! Back quickly to the mellow cornet, please.
     
  2. BachStrad1

    BachStrad1 Pianissimo User

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    Andy-I agree that the dark mournful sound of a flugel is bewutiful, but we're debating trumpets vs cornets. I find the sweet, pure voice of a cornet well played almost ethereal.

    Graysono-Yes, there are, to my delight, many non-stuffy cornets. My Committee cornet is a dream. Very free in all registers. It sings like an ange with just a sigh if breath, but give it the beans & it can shiver the timbers. I also have a Holton that us very free...a bit trumpety, though. The Olds Ambassadors are wonderful little horns, with lovely,sweet voices and built like tanks. There are some things that are just wrong for the trumpet.
     
  3. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    I'd agree with you there BachStrad and I forgot the put the smiley on the end, truth is I've been working with two lads this afternoon, Xeno TPT, Besson 600 CNT and to thicken our sound out I've been playing my old Brevete Flugel so I'm a little into that at this moment
     
  4. Dale Proctor

    Dale Proctor Utimate User

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    Although I'm sure some cornets are stuffy (just as are some trumpets), the main problem is that people want to play them on a C-cup mouthpiece with a 27 throat. To fully appreciate what a cornet is, and to get the most out of one, they must be played on a "proper" mouthpiece - a deep one with a very large throat. If folks would do that, the stuffiness will not be there and the cornet will sing. Sure, it will take more effort to play, but it's worth it.
     
  5. graysono

    graysono Mezzo Forte User

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    Y'all ought to get Ruby Braff's Just the Three of Us (I think that's the name of the album). Himself on cornet with guitar and bass. Talk about yer mellow. As BachStrad1 says, there are some things that are just for cornet.
     
  6. graysono

    graysono Mezzo Forte User

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    One observation, and one question for you Andy. I note the DEG Signature in your lineup. I won one on an eBay auction, once. It was one of the finest cornets I've ever played. But is was mis-advertised so I sent it back with enough reputation threats attached that I got my money back. I am sorry about that in many ways. When they say that Getzen "gets" cornets, they are right.

    Now about your Brevete flugel: There's one in the neighborhood--guy wants $750--and it has me thinking. Yeah, what do I need another flugel for? Do you like it? SORRY FOR THE MOMENTARY HIGHJACK, GUYS.
     
  7. Cornyandy

    Cornyandy Fortissimo User

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    Love the brevete flugel, by far the best one I have ever played despite rescuing it from a scarecrow in a festival It was on a Jazz Scarecrow and at the end of the week was about to be thrown away. I got it for a fiver donation to charity. It is beat up to hell more raw brass than silver plate and now has elastic round the water key, I needed it in a hurry this aftenoon. The mouthpiece is ancient and looks more like a F****h horn mouthpiece and that gives it such a dark rich tone it sounds about an octave lower than it plays. If you have the chance of one I am sure you won't regret it. $750 does seem a bit steep to me though unless it is perfect

    The DEG is simply the second best cornet I have ever played (I have had my hands on a Benge wich is marginally nicer). It was a bit of a mistake too it was advertised as a Getzen DEG Signature Eterna, however when I got it I liked it a lot better than the two Eternas I had had my hands on so I kept it. It seemed to have more core to the sound and more cornet fluffiness without being stuffy. I have never had a cornet so responsive to dynamic needs and it blows like a gale. I also like the trigger position it seems more natural than any other cornet I have had.
     
  8. Vega Power

    Vega Power Piano User

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    In this era where the trumpet is king, it makes me smile to have just picked up a very nice Olds Recording cornet for $425.
     
  9. coolerdave

    coolerdave Utimate User

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    My first year of playing I rented a trumpet that had a split in the lead pipe... didn't find out about it until that summer so the band director would loan me his vintage cornet ( I am pretty sure it was a very nice 1920's Conn). Over the summer I actually learned how to play and wound up playing the first chair in the Jr High band the following fall ... I really believe all the benefits to playing cornet when learning really had alot to do with it. True cornets just seem easier to move around on IMHO.
    As to the sound, I wonder why more jazz combos don't play them ... they get that really cool mellow sound.
     
  10. rankamateur

    rankamateur Mezzo Forte User

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    Interesting. But put this way, it does, indeed make sense to learn and teach the trumpet over the cornet if you are looking at being a professional musician. Come to think of it, the cornet does seem to be regarded as more of a hobby instrument than a professional one. Don't get me wrong here - I am a cornet player first and foremost and all my formal tuition was done on a cornet so I recognise the value and the beauty of the instrument. But if you make music your living, I can see why you'd be in a better position as a trumpet player. You can always move into brass band teaching and playing and if you are really insistent on being a cornet player some music colleges (such as the RNCM) offer specialisation in the cornet, if desired, as far as I know.
     

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