Could you critique me?

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by Fusion2002, Feb 1, 2005.

  1. Fusion2002

    Fusion2002 New Friend

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    Dec 11, 2004
    Manny,

    Today I had the oppertunity to record Prayer of St. Gregory with the University of Minnesota Morris Concert Band. I was wondering if you had the time, if you could listen to my recording and give me some feedback. I thought it would be a good idea to get a real professionals opinion. If you would be willing to listen, I would appreciate it. I know your a buisy person, and your time is valuable. Thanks for all the advice you give on this forum.

    http://www.tomhenchal.com/music/tomhenchal_prayer_of_st_gregory_01_31_05.mp3
    (right click and "save as" for best results)

    -Tom Henchal
     
  2. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
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    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    Dear Tom,

    Nice job. I'm going to have to learn to do this sound-file business... could be fun for a forum like this.

    This is a difficult piece. I say that because it is extremely easy to get caught up in the meditative, somewhat hypnotic character of it. The reason that's not a good thing is that it can develop a sameness of sound and what it begs for is variation in tone color. I found a bit of that in your interpretation. Try different vibrati also. Pace your phrases so it sounds like you're talking to us.

    Now, for something a bit more technical: I detected too much "wa-wa" between notes in many of the entrances and sixteenth note runs. If you can imagine the difference between linked sausage which is crimped and sliced bread which looks the same except for the fact that it's sliced you'll have a visual picture of what I was hearing. Scale exercises will get rid of that if you listen closely. It comes from over manipulation of the lips during slurred pasages. Sort of like chewing each note. Just about every trumpet player does that. It's a protection against cracking a note or forcing it to speak. Just notice it next time you play and you'll fix it.

    It sounded as though you were playing on C trumpet. Am I right? There were some notes played repeatedly that were characteristically out of tune. Just make a few minor adjustments and you'll have a lovely interpretation of this piece.

    Last thing: see if you can get the band to play a little softer. It'll add a bit more atmosphere and make the climax more meaningful.

    Thanks for the treat!

    ML
     
  3. JackD

    JackD Mezzo Forte User

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    Nov 30, 2003
    Manchester / London
    I agree Manny, it would be really cool if more people posted sound clips.

    Tom - I posted on your thread on TH. Unlike Manny I'm just a lowly student, so please take my opinions for what they're worth!

    Cheers for sharing,

    Jack.
     
  4. Fusion2002

    Fusion2002 New Friend

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    Dec 11, 2004
    this was played on by Bb Getzen 3051 with a GR 3M , I dont own a C trumpet. Thanks for the Advice, Manny, and Jack. I've been getting quite a bit of feedback, and I really appreciate it. I love how I can get so many different comments, as people have different ideas of what it should sound like.

    As far as intonation issues... my lesson teacher pointed out that my E's were a few cents flat, was that was you were refering to? I've really noticed that I have trouble zoning in on correct pitches sometimes. Any suggestions how I can train my ears to hear more exact pitches?

    Just for clarification, in the sausage/bread example.... I should be going for the "sliced bread" sound... correct? Meaning a smooth transition between notes?

    Thanks again for the input, and thanks for spending the time to dowload and listen. I really enjoy getting really good constructive feedback!

    Our performance of the piece will be on Sunday, I'll let you all know how it turns out. Thanks!
     
  5. B15M

    B15M Forte User

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    Dec 30, 2003
    Monroe Ct.
    I would love to put a clip on here but I don't know how to do it.

    Manny,

    If you will listen I will send you a home made cd.

    I used to have a bad intonation problem. I fixed it by recording myself over and over again and following along with the music. I marked the trouble parts and did it over again. after a while I could hear it. I still record myself all the time.
     
  6. ScreaminRaider

    ScreaminRaider Piano User

    390
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    Apr 22, 2004
    San Antonio, Tx
    Fussion: I'm not Manny, and not nearly as qualified to answer, but I still have a suggestion. I have always had the same problem with hearing those darn notes. What I like to do is sit down at the piano and play the note on the piano, sing it, then play it on my horn. I do this for at leat 10-15 minutes aday. It really helps my intonation. Hope that helps.
     
  7. Manny Laureano

    Manny Laureano Utimate User

    5,915
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    Sep 29, 2004
    USA
    "As far as intonation issues... my lesson teacher pointed out that my E's were a few cents flat, was that was you were refering to? I've really noticed that I have trouble zoning in on correct pitches sometimes. Any suggestions how I can train my ears to hear more exact pitches?"

    Your ears will hear pitch as in tune or out of tune in a natural way. You either hear it or you don't, in other words. The thing to do is follow SRs suggestion and go to an in tune piano and just learn that there are certain notes such as the E you mentioned, and learn where to put it. If you could have someone else play the piano while you play your horn that would be the best scenario. Do what you must with your lips.

    At your stage of the game you should have a greater awareness of the out of tune notes on your horn. Think of it as have a mental inventory of intonation. When you approach a certain note there should already be a reaction before the note is played. Then you fix it mentally before you play it.

    "Just for clarification, in the sausage/bread example.... I should be going for the "sliced bread" sound... correct? Meaning a smooth transition between notes?"

    Absolutely. The best description I can give you is the following" think of when you've played a fast, ripping scale, say, F to F. You don't have time to make the minute adjustments you're currently making and you get the sliced bread quality. The trick is to be able to get the same quality at a much slower pace.

    Again, nice job.

    ML
     
  8. tpter1

    tpter1 Forte User

    Age:
    53
    2,259
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    Jan 12, 2005
    Northern New York
    I'm not as qualified as Manny, either, but I have had my conductors and principal make some very good comments about my improved intonation. This is what I did:

    1. Invest in a BERP. During the warm-up, I use the tuner function of my Dr. Beat to set a constant pitch, and begin a P5 above the sounding note. I listen for the resultant tone between the BERP (me, actually) and the tone. Then play (softly) either some "lip slur" excercises or scale passages.

    2. During my lip flexibility practice I do the same, but set the tuner to the fundamental of the slur (the last note).

    3. Practice in a very live room, and listen for the "ringing" of overtones-even at pp.

    4. Sing! Sing! (let me say it again at the risk of being redundant) Sing!

    A few years agao, there was a program developed by Coda Music Technologies (makers of SmartMusic and Finale) called Intonation trainer. The program enables you (among other things) to make a database of all the out of tune notes on your instrument, and how far off they are.
     

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