Counting and Sight Reading

Discussion in 'Trumpet Discussion' started by etoapps, Feb 8, 2014.

  1. etoapps

    etoapps New Friend

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    For instrumentalists PRACTISING and READING MUSIC is a two pronged activity.
    1) To read the music notation.
    2) to control the piece of wood, metal and/ or strings to make the sounds that correspond with what you need to read.

    To improve both need repetition.
    Oh! but its SO difficult sometimes to motivate yourself or, as a teacher, your pupils to do the necessary repetitions of sections that are found difficult. Repetitive practice will make the above mentioned activities into reflex actions; eventually developing the control allows musical interpretation. There is no substitution.

    eto Apps

    • Makes practice enjoyable with the option of accompaniments 24/ 7 therefore it’s likely that more practice will take place
    • More practice leads to more control over your instrument; repeat any bar or section at a variety of tempi
    • More control allows for more musical playing.
    • More musical success makes you feel good so you’ll want to do even more practice.
    • OK, we are biased, but we are professional Jazz Musicians and Music educators so we created our Apps with that knowledge !
    • Delighted to have feedback from anyone, Good or Bad, as to using technology to help practise !:-)
    SIGHT READING
    The secret of sight reading is knowing exactly where you are in the bar. That means counting. I suggest that the better you are the MORE you count NOT the less you count. With practice you can develop this awareness.

    There should always be the awareness of the count in the back of your mind. That’s way a conductor move his baton in a particular way.(or should !)
    To this end WebPractice has a real time beat counter which reminds you exactly where you are in the bar.
    In my experience this beat counter together with the facility of repeating any bar or section at a variety of tempi is what makes eto Apps so effective.
     
  2. mike ansberry

    mike ansberry Forte User

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    I think the secret to sight reading is audiation. You have to be able to hear in you mind what you see on the page instantly. After that all your repetitive practice kicks in and your fingers and embouchure make it happen more or less automatically.
     
  3. rowuk

    rowuk Moderator Staff Member

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    The secret to sight reading is having enough patterns stored. I will explain:

    We are creatures of habit. Things that we do well have been practiced. If we examine how we read text, we discover that as a young child we read single letters, then groups of letters, later on, we read the shape of a word, not the word itself. This is possible because we store "shapes" as patterns in our brains. The same is true when playing. Scales, intervals, patterns (for Jazz, Clarke,...) are stored and we recall them as necessary.

    http://www.iub.edu/~canlab/Publications_files/CABN_05.pdf

    So, few patterns developed reduces our site reading to really reading each single note, generally preventing us from being very convincing - or even keeping time. The more patterns that we have committed to memory, the better our sitereading becomes. The more complex the stored patterns, the easier we have it with harder pieces to siteread.

    The best studio musicians have an ENORMOUS quantity of patterns available. That is why they can come in with little or no rehearsal and simply kick ass.

    To store a pattern, we generally need hundreds to thousands of repetitions.

    A scale a day keeps the auditions OK...................
     
  4. etoapps

    etoapps New Friend

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    Feb 7, 2014
    Yes, I am with you on that !
     
  5. etoapps

    etoapps New Friend

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    Feb 7, 2014
    Thank you \Mike.....good to nkow
     
  6. mrsemman

    mrsemman Piano User

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    While I still have great difficulty with sight reading, I have found that the above is true, but in the sense that the musician knows the notes i.e. the fingering and sound and values beforehand, and can identify the tempo, and apply it. Again, this is what I have observed and I am working on perfecting.

    I have found the Rhythm Madness book by Rich Wiley to quite beneficial in this process.

    Gary
     
  7. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    The secret to site reading is to sing it to yourself first.
     
  8. gmonady

    gmonady Utimate User

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    The next best secret is to not let it get to you.

    I went into an audition for the Colorado State University Big Bands (they have 5) with a faculty member stating I didn't have a chance, because I was a Chemistry Grad student and not a music major. Fortunately my girlfriend at the time, convinced me to give it a try. On my way to the audition, I was nervous as heck. But when I arrived, I noted the line of trumpet players waiting to audition was winding around 5 hallways. My fear went away, as I felt, I did not have a snowball's chance in heck. Anxiety was suddenly resolved. I went in to the audition and sight read those charts, one at a time, like it was nothing. Went into the improve session (with no chordal instrument behind me) and blew threw the changes relaxed and with the perspective that I wanted to really entertain the judges (not to show them what I got). Attitude and mind set is everything to site reading. I came away with the first chair in the first band after that audition.
     
  9. Vulgano Brother

    Vulgano Brother Moderator Staff Member

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    All the comments about sight-reading (as opposed to "site reading" or "cite reeding".....) thus far have been good. I would add "hearing in advance" the the notion that the intervals give us a clue to turn sight-reading from a technical process to a musical one. It is a way to put that "major thirds sound happy, minor thirds sound sad" stuff to work.

    Just a thought.....
     
  10. mrsemman

    mrsemman Piano User

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    Not to hijack this thread, but, most times, the bands I play in hand out about a dozen pieces to play. Most I have never heard nor seen prior, and there is very little time to check the piece out prior to playing. So it is reading and playing on the fly, so to speak.
     

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